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Morning Cup of Links: Rabbit Hopping Championships

The world now has seven billion people. A video from NPR helps us to visualize how that happened so quickly.
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The 25 Best Pictures From The 2011 European Rabbit Hopping Championships. Hop, bunny, hop!
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The New Science Behind Your Spending Addiction. The preference for instant gratification may be hard wired into the human brain.
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What's the worst possible situation to be caught texting in? Driving, yes, but texting during your own wedding ceremony is pretty close.
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An adorably goofy dog was spotted on a seesaw with his boy. He also bears a resemblance to a certain Pixar pup.
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How to break the speed of light by pointing a laser at the moon. I don't quite understand how this relates to Einstein, but I may have to try it.
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How Cell Phones Shape the Lives of College Students. Mainly, they love and depend on them.
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Performance bonuses for teachers is already a sticky subject because they don't start off with a level playing field. The latest experiment is to pay teacher bonuses based on how much parents become involved.
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6 Cool Plants I Would Find a Way to Kill. Stacy needs to update this and let us know how her houseplants are doing now.

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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video
A Tour of the New York Academy of Medicine's Rare Book Room
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The Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine documents the evolution of our medical knowledge. Its books and artifacts are as bizarre as they are fascinating. Read more here.

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