CLOSE
Original image

Four Cemeteries That Were “Relocated”

Original image

You’re familiar with the scenario from your favorite horror movies: when a family moves into a house inconveniently built on top of a graveyard, ghostly shenanigans and otherworldly horrors ensue. But it’s not just a plot in Poltergeist - cemeteries are relocated more frequently than you might think. We like to think that the bodies make the move along with their headstones, but as you’ll see, that’s not always the case.

1. Are the New Orleans Saints getting penalized by beings other than the refs? When ground was broken for the Superdome back in 1971, crews brought up bones by the backhoe-full. It didn’t take long to determine that they had discovered what was left of the Girod Street Cemetery (pictured), an above-ground burial ground for victims of Yellow Fever and cholera. Though the cemetery was deconsecrated in 1957, not every body buried there was moved. If someone didn’t claim their long-dead relatives, the deceased were just were just left there, coffins and all. Needless to say, many people chalked up the Saints’ losing streak to spirits that were angry about their remains being unceremoniously dug up to make way for a football field. At least two voodoo priestesses tried to remove the so-called curse; so did a nun. None of those attempts worked, but apparently something finally did since the Saints won the Super Bowl in 2010.

2. When the Eisenhower Expressway was built in the late ‘50s, at least 2,000 graves were moved from three different cemeteries in Forest Park, Illinois, to make way.

3. It’s not scheduled to open until 2016, but when the Shanghai Disney Resort does admit its first guests, they might find a real ghost or two lurking in the Haunted Mansion. Hundreds of tombs had to be moved to make way for Mickey’s latest home; families with deceased loved ones being relocated received 300 yuan (about $47) per body. As far as we know, everything was properly moved... I suppose time will tell.

4. Back in about 1843, part of Chicago’s famous Lincoln Park was actually a cemetery. Concerned about cholera, city officials decided to relocate the dead - including about 4,000 Confederate soldiers - to a less central location that might protect the living from disease. When work began on a parking garage in Lincoln Park in 1998, at least 80 bodies were discovered, making it pretty clear that not all of the cemetery’s residents had found their way to the new digs on the south side of Chicago. At least one tomb is obviously still there; you can find the mausoleum of innkeeper Ira Couch located behind the Chicago History Museum.

Do you know of any other relocations that may not have actually been completed? Let us know about it in the comments.

Original image
Getty
Take a Rare Glimpse Inside the World's Largest Seed Reserve
Original image
Getty

Since 2008, the remote Arctic island of Spitsbergen has been home to the world’s largest seed storage facility, known as the Svalbard Global Seed Vault.

The 11,000-square-foot facility contains nearly 865,000 seed samples—many of which are crops—and functions as both a reserve in the event of a catastrophe and as a backup for other seed banks around the world. Countries can send samples for preservation and access the reserves as needed (the effort is funded by Norway in conjunction with the organization Crop Trust). The vault was opened for the first time last year in light of the destruction caused by the Syrian War.

Access to the fault is notoriously limited, but AJ+ has a glimpse inside on its YouTube page. It’s a rare look at a place that isn’t known for its looks, but holds some of the planet’s most beautiful and valuable offerings.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

Original image
iStock
This Infographic Explains the Difference Between Perfume and Eau de Toilette
Original image
iStock

Ever wondered why you can't smell the perfume you dabbed on earlier this morning? Maybe it's because you aren't actually wearing perfume. Instead, you likely applied eau de toilette, cologne, or another type of fragrance.

These sprays contain different concentrations of fragrance oil dissolved in solutions of alcohol and water. Scents with a heavier amount of oil are stronger, they're more expensive, and they also last for longer periods of time. Even the most discerning shopper might not know whether to opt for parfum or eu de parfum when perusing bottles of Chanel No. 5 at the fragrance counter—or even realize there's a difference. 

If you'd prefer to smell like a few roses instead of a field of them, it's handy to know the difference between perfume, eau de parfum, eau de toilette, cologne, and eau fraiche when you're out shopping for a new scent. Lifehacker recently ran this handy infographic by Real Men Real Style, which breaks down the strength of each fragrance along with how long it lasts. Use it as a guide to purchase the perfect product for you.

[h/t Lifehacker]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios