CLOSE
Corbis, Peay Designs
Corbis, Peay Designs

The Most Popular Halloween Costumes (1985-1993)

Corbis, Peay Designs
Corbis, Peay Designs

We’ve shown you some of the best costumes from the last few Halloweens. Do you remember what you pulled on in 1993, though? We combed through old newspapers to find the top costumes from the 80s and early 90s. Anybody slip into one of these?

1993: “So Barney the Dinosaur, Aladdin, and Jasmine walk into a Halloween party…”

1992: Catwoman and Batman were hot sellers in the wake of Batman Returns, but so was a slightly less terrifying subject: Ross Perot.

1991: There was no clear winner in this year’s Associated Press story, but the Terminator, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Freddy Krueger, and Scarlett O’Hara all rolled out in full force.

1990: Ninja Turtles had been just as popular the previous year, and Homer, Bart, and the rest of the Simpsons moved some units of their own.

1989: Tim Burton’s Batman kicked off a wave of enthusiasm for borderline comically expensive Caped Crusader and Joker getups. A piece in the Richmond Times-Dispatch a week before Halloween noted that factories were working round-the-clock to crank out official Batman ($275) and Joker ($320!) costumes.

Revelers who preferred more realistic outfits had a big year, too. An AP story noted that imprisoned televangelist/hucksters Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker were hot costumes.

1988: Freddy Krueger and Elvira were the big hits, although the California Raisins garnered their fair share of costume sales, too.

1986: We’ll let this AP headline speak for itself: “Ninja, sexy witch top Halloween costumes.”

1985: Hulk Hogan and Elvira were the biggest sellers, although the AP noted Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan were hot, too. (This was truly a great Halloween for Patrick Swayze’s gang from Point Break.)

This story originally appeared in 2011.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
Here's What to Do With Leftover Halloween Candy
iStock
iStock

Americans indulged their sweet tooth in a major way this Halloween, spending an estimated $2.7 billion on candy intended for front porch distribution. Rather than confronting a weepy child with an empty bowl because they bought too little, shoppers tend to buy in bulk. Come November, that can mean pounds of sugar-packed temptation still sitting in the house.

The good news: You can remove the risk to your waistline and do some good at the same time. A number of charitable organizations take leftover candy and send it to troops stationed overseas. Operation Gratitude has set up a number of drop-off centers around the country—you can search by zip code—to accept your extra treats. Once collected, they’ll send them to both troops and first responders. Last year, the group collected nearly 534,000 pounds of goodies.

Often, drop-off locations will be located in dental offices as a way of reminding everyone of the perils of tooth decay from excess sugar consumption. Some dentists even offer buy-back programs, paying $1 for each pound returned.

If donating to a national program is proving difficult, you can always deliver the extra candy to local food pantries or homeless shelters.

[h/t weartv.com]  

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Health
The FDA Has a Warning for People Who Love Black Licorice
iStock
iStock

Every Halloween, children and adults alike gorge on candy. One estimate puts the number of junk calories consumed at up to 7000 per kid, the equivalent of 13 Big Macs. While all of that sugar is most certainly not healthy, Consumerist reports that there’s actually a more immediate danger to your well-being: black licorice.

Most versions of the candy, which gains some popularity around the spooky season, contains glycyrrhizin, a sweetening compound found in the licorice root. While tasty, glycyrrhizin can affect potassium levels in the body, causing them to fall to dangerously low levels. High blood pressure, swelling, and even heart issues can develop as a result.

It’s not just bingeing that can cause issues. According to the Food and Drug Administration, adults over 40 who eat more than two ounces of black licorice a day for two weeks could suffer heart problems like arrhythmia. If you have a history of heart disease, you’re even more susceptible to complications.

The FDA recommends using a little common sense when consuming black licorice, eating it in moderate amounts and stopping if you notice any adverse symptoms. If you do experience potassium level drops, it’s usually reversible once you put the bag down. Treats that are licorice-flavored are typically artificial and won’t have the same effect as the actual plant root—but for your waistline’s sake, try to avoid gorging on anything.

[h/t Consumerist]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios