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The Weird Week in Review

Curry-Eating Contest Sends Two To Hospital

Kismot in Edinburgh, Scotland is a restaurant known for its hot chili pepper curry. It staged a curry-eating contest this past Saturday to benefit the Children's Hospice Association Fund. Contestants ate spoonfuls of increasingly hot curry until they dropped out. Local patron Mike Lavin make it to fifth place and American Curie Kim came in second as others cried, screamed, and threw up, then dropped out. Both were later taken to a hospital (Kim twice). Although the restaurant may have to pay the medical bills, they raised £1000 ($1546) for the charity.

Koala Survives Impact and Grill Ride

Mark and Caroline Harris of Eagleby, Queensland, Australia, were driving along the Pacific Motorway Tuesday night when they hit an animal. Mark Harris thought it was a cat, and he pulled over at the next off ramp to check for damage. He was surprised to find a koala lodged in his car's grill. The koala was alive, but choking on a piece of plastic around its neck. Harris pried the plastic away with a tire iron and took the koala, now named Kenny, to a veterinary hospital. Harris returned to visit Kenny a couple of days later and was pleased to see the koala is recovering from his mishap.

The Homecoming Queen's Got a Kick

For the first time ever, Pinckney Community High School in Michigan crowned a homecoming queen they had to summon from the locker room. Brianna Amat received the title while wearing her football uniform, complete with shoulder pads. But that wasn't the end of the 18-year-old field goal kicker's big night last Friday. She also won the game.

A short while later, with five minutes to play in the third quarter, Amat was called to the same field to attempt a 31-yard field goal. She split the uprights.

The kick proved decisive as Pinckney held on for a 9-7 victory against a Grand Blanc team that had come into the game ranked seventh in the state in its division. It also earned Amat the nickname the Kicking Queen.

Amat, who maintains a 4.0 GPA and is active in student government, is an experienced soccer player and the first girl to make the school's varsity football squad.

Cat Leads RSPCA to Kittens

A witness in March, Cambridgeshire, England saw a black cat being thrown from a car. It took two weeks of feeding to capture the cat, which was then taken to an RSPCA shelter. Animal advocates cleaned and treated the cat (and named her Jolie), but discovered she had recently given birth, so she was returned to the area from which she was captured. Jolie called out, but it became apparent she wasn't calling the kittens, but to RSPCA inspector Jon Knight who accompanied her! The mother cat only moved forward when Knight moved to follow. Jolie led Knight to a stash of four dehydrated kittens behind a pile of wood. Knight said the kittens were so far from their starting point that there was no way he would have found them without Jolie's guidance. The kittens, so young their eyes were not open, were taken to the shelter and nursed back to health.

Whale Beached a Half-Mile Inland

A dead whale was found over 800 yards from shore in East Yorkshire, England. It was a relatively rare whale, too, a 33-foot-long female Sei whale. Sei whales have only been sighted three times in the past 20 years around England, as they normally stay in deep water. Experts believe the whale swam up the Humber estuary during the high equinox tide, and was stranded on land when the tide went out again. That explanation did not deter some from speculating that the whale dropped from the sky, or was placed on land by aliens.

Driverless Car Doing Doughnuts

Emergency crews responded to a report of a driverless car running in circles in Wildwood, New Jersey on Sunday. Wildwood Fire Captain Chris D’Amico eventually stopped the vehicle.

"I've never corralled a car before," D'Amico said.

D’Amico said that he found an opportunity to jump into the passenger-side window while he was standing inside the circle the car was making.

Comments at the story remembered Ford having recalls of vehicles from that era that would slip out of park into reverse gear. See a video of the car in action.

Girl Eats Muffin Containing $800 Gold Necklace

Xaio Li of Qingdao, Shangdong province, China, bought an $800 gold necklace for his girlfriend's 22nd birthday. He baked her a muffin and hid the necklace inside. You can see where this is going. The girlfriend, Wang Xue, ate the muffin and its contents in one gulp before he could warn her. Xaio described the necklace to Wang on the way to the local hospital, where the necklace was retrieved by endoscopic surgery, which involved putting a probe down her esophagus into her stomach.

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Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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Food
Cheese Wheel Wedding Cakes Are a Funky Twist on an Old Tradition
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

If there’s ever a time you have permission to be cheesy, it’s on your wedding day. What better way to do so than with a pungent wedding cake made of actual wheels of cheese? According to Elite Daily, cheese wedding cakes are a real option for couples who share an affinity for dairy products.

One of the trailblazers behind the sharp trend is Bath, England-based cheese supplier The Fine Cheese Co. The company offers clients a choice of one of dozens of wedding cake designs. There are bold show-stoppers like the Beatrice cake, which features five tiers of cheese and is priced at $400. For customers looking for something more delicate, there’s the Clara centerpiece, which replaces miniature wedding cakes with mounds of goat cheese. Whether your loved one likes funky Stilton or mellow brie, there’s a cheese cake to satisfy every palate. Flowers are incorporated into each display to make them just as pretty as conventional wedding cakes.

Since The Fine Cheese Co. arranged their first wedding cake in 2002, other cheese suppliers have entered the game. The Cheese Shed in Newton Abbot, England; I.J. Ellis Cheesemongers in Scotland; and Murray’s Cheese in New York will provide cheese wheel towers for weddings or any other special occasion. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from clearing out the local fromagerie and assembling a cheese cake at home.

[h/t Elite Daily]

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Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
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History
The Funky History of George Washington's Fake Teeth
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo

George Washington may have the most famous teeth—or lack thereof—in American history. But counter to what you may have heard about the Founding Father's ill-fitting dentures, they weren't made of wood. In fact, he had several sets of dentures throughout his life, none of which were originally trees. And some of them are still around. The historic Mount Vernon estate holds the only complete set of dentures that has survived the centuries, and the museum features a video that walks through old George's dental history.

Likely due to genetics, poor diet, and dental disease, Washington began losing his original teeth when he was still a young man. By the time he became president in 1789, he only had one left in his mouth. The dentures he purchased to replace his teeth were the most scientifically advanced of the time, but in the late 18th century, that didn't mean much.

They didn't fit well, which caused him pain, and made it difficult to eat and talk. The dentures also changed the way Washington looked. They disfigured his face, causing his lips to noticeably stick out. But that doesn't mean Washington wasn't grateful for them. When he finally lost his last surviving tooth, he sent it to his dentist, John Greenwood, who had made him dentures of hippo ivory, gold, and brass that accommodated the remaining tooth while it still lived. (The lower denture of that particular pair is now held at the New York Academy of Medicine.)

A set of historic dentures
George Washington's Mount Vernon

These days, no one would want to wear dentures like the ones currently held at Mount Vernon (above). They're made of materials that would definitely leave a bad taste in your mouth. The base that fit the fake teeth into the jaw was made of lead. The top teeth were sourced from horses or donkeys, and the bottom were from cows and—wait for it—people.

These teeth actually deteriorated themselves, revealing the wire that held them together. The dentures open and shut thanks to metal springs, but because they were controlled by springs, if he wanted to keep his mouth shut, Washington had to permanently clench his jaw. You can get a better idea of how the contraption worked in the video from Mount Vernon below.

Washington's Dentures from Mount Vernon on Vimeo.

There are plenty of lessons we can learn from the life of George Washington, but perhaps the most salient is this: You should definitely, definitely floss.

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