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Deep Fried on a Stick: Innovations in Fair Food

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The competition in selling food at fairs and carnivals is tremendous. Vendors seek publicity for the newest and most outrageous recipes to draw crowds. And since the fair is a once-a-year event for most people, they don't mind trying something new, even if it costs an arm and a leg and seems dangerous to one's cholesterol level. Here are some of the foods you might see at a fair near you.

Deep-fried Pickles

Atkins, Arkansas has been known as the "Pickle Capital of the World" for many years, as a pickle-packing plant dominated the town's industry beginning in 1946. Bernell "Fatman" Austin owned a restaurant just across the street from the pickle plant. In 1963, he developed a recipe for deep-fried dill pickles as a publicity stunt -one that worked, as celebrities sang its praises and the town began hosting the Picklefest in 1991. Austin died in 1999, and the pickle plant shut down in 2002, but his family still makes fried pickles for the fair every year. The recipe has found its way into other fairs, as well as restaurants and homes.

Deep-fried Bubblegum

Bubblegum is not food -it's a flavored toy you play with in your mouth. But a recipe for Deep-fried Bubblegum won the 2011 State Fair of Texas Seventh Annual Big Tex Choice Awards anyway. However, it's not really bubblegum. It's a bubblegum-flavored marshmallow dipped in pink bubblegum-flavored batter (if they can make toothpaste and medicine taste like bubblegum, they can flavor anything). The concoction is then deep-fried, rolled in powdered sugar, and topped with a spritz of icing. So go ahead and swallow it! Image by Ron Heflin/Star-Telegram.

Deep-fried Kool-Aid

It's not a drink dipped in batter that is fried, but the batter itself -which contains Kool-Aid powder. The creator of Deep-Fried Kool-Aid, “Chicken” Charlie Boghosian isn’t sharing the exact recipe, but it involves flour and Kool-Aid powder. And a deep-fryer. And possibly sugar. The ball-shaped sweet treats sold like hotcakes at the San Diego County Fair this year. Boghosian was previously responsible for the deep-fried Klondike bar and the deep-fried Pop Tart. Image by Jonathan Horn.

Deep-fried Butter

The ultimate in artery-clogging indulgance is Deep-fried Butter. Fair food veteran Abel Gonzales Jr. took his creation to the Texas State Fair a couple of years ago. His recipe uses the same trick as Deep-fried Ice Cream: coat and freeze the butter first, then fry it really fast. Gonzalez offers his butter balls in plains and in garlic, grape, or cherry flavors. But it's not really a new idea. Paula Deen had a recipe for Deep-fried Balls of Butter in 2007 (which contain cream cheese), although that may have been the result of a dare. Image by Kevin Brown/State Fair of Texas.

Deep-fried foods are popular because of their flavor and decadence, but putting food on a stick is downright practical. After all, it's hard to find a place to sit down and eat, much less a table to put your food on, at a crowded fair. It's also hard to find a place to wash your hands before and after eating. Something you can eat with one dirty hand while walking makes fairgoing much easier. A patent for fried foods on a stick such as the corndog was filed in 1927, and the idea spread through fairs over the next couple of decades.

French Fries On A Stick

The next step beyond a corndog would naturally be to include the entire meal on a stick. This French Fry-coated Hot Dog wraps a wiener in potatoes after it is coated with a batter that glues everything together. It was found in Seoul, South Korea, but should be offered at your local fair. Or you could make one yourself.

Deep-fried Stuffing On A Stick

Another recipe from Paul Deen puts a holiday staple into the realm of fair food. Deep-fried Stuffing On A Stick was a part of her show called Deep Fried Thanksgiving, which also included deep-fried cranberry fritters and deep-fried mashed potatoes with bacon.

Deep-fried Twinkies On A Stick

Now a fair staple, it is believed that Deep-fried Twinkies were developed by Christopher Sell of The Chip Shop in Brooklyn about ten years ago. Sell experimented with many sweet treats to go with the fish and chips in which his shop specializes (they were dipped in the same oil the fish was fried in). The experiment that held up the best was Twinkies. Clint and Rocky Mullin took the recipe to fairs, where it was put on a stick and became a hit. Here's a recipe that doesn't call for anything to do with fish.

Deep-fried Peanut Butter and Jelly On A Stick

Fried peanut butter and jelly sandwiches aren't exactly new, as people have made them for kids along with grilled cheese sandwiches and Elvis' grilled peanut butter and banana sandwiches. But dipping them in batter and deep-frying PB&Js broke into the fair scene a couple of years ago. And they are served on a stick because they are hot and can be messy. Here's a recipe you can try at home. It only lacks the stick, which is pretty easy to add if you want to eat them while walking.

There's no end to the odd dishes available at fairs, mostly fried and conveniently skewered with a stick so you can keep your dirty hands from getting any greasier.

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entertainment
10 Surprising Facts About The Babadook
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In 2014, The Babadook came out of nowhere and scared audiences across the globe. Written and directed by Aussie Jennifer Kent, and based on her short film Monster, The Babadook is about a widow named Amelia (played by Kent’s drama schoolmate Essie Davis) who has trouble controlling her young son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), who thinks there’s a monster living in their house. Amelia reads Samuel a pop-up book, Mister Babadook, and Samuel manifests the creature into a real-life monster. The Babadook may be the villain, but the film explores the pitfalls of parenting and grief in an emotional way. 

“I never approached this as a straight horror film,” Kent told Complex. “I always was drawn to the idea of grief, and the suppression of that grief, and the question of, how would that affect a person? ... But at the core of it, it’s about the mother and child, and their relationship.”

Shot on a $2 million budget, the film grossed more than $10.3 million worldwide and gained an even wider audience via streaming networks. Instead of creating Babadook out of CGI, a team generated the images in-camera, inspired by the silent films of Georges Méliès and Lon Chaney. Here are 10 things you might not have known about The Babadook (dook, dook).

1. THE NAME “BABADOOK” WAS EASY FOR A CHILD TO INVENT.

Jennifer Kent told Complex that some people thought the creature’s name sounded “silly,” which she agreed with. “I wanted it to be like something a child could make up, like ‘jabberwocky’ or some other nonsensical name,” she explained. “I wanted to create a new myth that was just solely of this film and didn’t exist anywhere else.”

2. JENNIFER KENT WAS WORRIED PEOPLE WOULD JUDGE THE MOTHER.

Amelia isn’t the best mother in the world—but that’s the point. “I’m not a parent,” Kent told Rolling Stone, “but I’m surrounded by friends and family who are, and I see it from the outside … how parenting seems hard and never-ending.” She thought Amelia would receive “a lot of flak” for her flawed parenting, but the opposite happened. “I think it’s given a lot of women a sense of reassurance to see a real human being up there,” Kent said. “We don’t get to see characters like her that often.”

3. KENT AND ESSIE DAVIS TONED DOWN THE CONTENT FOR THE KID.

Noah Wiseman was six years old when he played Samuel. Kent and Davis made sure he wasn’t present for the more horrific scenes, like when Amelia tells Samuel she wishes he was the one who died, not her husband. “During the reverse shots, where Amelia was abusing Sam verbally, we had Essie yell at an adult stand-in on his knees,” Kent told Film Journal. “I didn’t want to destroy a childhood to make this film—that wouldn’t be fair.”

Kent explained a “kiddie version” of the plot to Wiseman. “I said, ‘Basically, Sam is trying to save his mother and it’s a film about the power of love.’”

4. THE FILM IS ALSO ABOUT “FACING OUR SHADOW SIDE.”

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Kent told Film Journal that “The Babadook is a film about a woman waking up from a long, metaphorical sleep and finding that she has the power to protect herself and her son.” She noted that everybody has darkness to face. “Beyond genre and beyond being scary, that’s the most important thing in the film—facing our shadow side.”

5. THE FILM SCARED THE HELL OUT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EXORCIST.

In an interview with Uproxx, William Friedkin—director of The Exorcist—said The Babadook was one of the best and scariest horror films he’d ever seen. He especially liked the emotional aspect of the film. “It’s not only the simplicity of the filmmaking and the excellence of the acting not only by the two leads, but it’s the way the film works slowly but inevitably on your emotions,” he said.

6. AN ART DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT SCORED THE ROLE AS THE BABADOOK.

Tim Purcell worked in the film’s art department but then got talked into playing the titular character after he acted as the creature for some camera tests. “They realized they could save some money, and have me just be the Babadook, and hence I became the Babadook,” Purcell told New York Magazine. “In terms of direction, it was ‘be still a lot,’” he said.

7. THE MOVIE BOMBED IN ITS NATIVE AUSTRALIA.

Even though Kent shot the film in Adelaide, Australians didn’t flock to the theaters; it grossed just $258,000 in its native country. “Australians have this [built-in] aversion to seeing Australian films,” Kent told The Cut. “They hardly ever get excited about their own stuff. We only tend to love things once everyone else confirms they’re good … Australian creatives have always had to go overseas to get recognition. I hope one day we can make a film or work of art and Australians can think it’s good regardless of what the rest of the world thinks.”

8. YOU CAN OWN A MISTER BABADOOK BOOK (BUT IT WILL COST YOU). 

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In 2015, Insight Editions published 6200 pop-up books of Mister Babadook. Kent worked with the film’s illustrator, Alexander Juhasz, who created the book for the movie. He and paper engineer Simon Arizpe brought the pages to life for the published version. All copies sold out but you can find some Kent-signed ones on eBay, going for as much as $500.

9. THE BABADOOK IS A GAY ICON.

It started at the end of 2016, when a Tumblr user started a jokey thread about how he thought the Babadook was gay. “It started picking up steam within a few weeks,” Ian, the Tumblr user, told New York Magazine, “because individuals who I presume are heterosexual kind of freaked out over the assertion that a horror movie villain would identify as queer—which I think was the actual humor of the post, as opposed to just the outright statement that the Babadook is gay.” In June, the Babadook became a symbol for Gay Pride month. Images of the character appeared everywhere at this year's Gay Pride Parade in Los Angeles.

10. DON'T HOLD YOUR BREATH FOR A SEQUEL.

Kent, who owns the rights to The Babadook, told IGN that, despite the original film's popularity, she's not planning on making any sequels. “The reason for that is I will never allow any sequel to be made, because it’s not that kind of film,” she said. “I don’t care how much I’m offered, it’s just not going to happen.”

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Space
NASA Is Posting Hundreds of Retro Flight Research Videos on YouTube
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If you’re interested in taking a tour through NASA history, head over to the YouTube page of the Armstrong Flight Research Center, located at Edwards Air Force Base, in southern California. According to Motherboard, the agency is in the middle of posting hundreds of rare aircraft videos dating back to the 1940s.

In an effort to open more of its archives to the public, NASA plans to upload 500 historic films to YouTube over the next few months. More than 300 videos have been published so far, and they range from footage of a D-558 Skystreak jet being assembled in 1947 to a clip of the first test flight of an inflatable-winged plane in 2001. Other highlights include the Space Shuttle Endeavour's final flight over Los Angeles and a controlled crash of a Boeing 720 jet.

The research footage was available to the public prior to the mass upload, but viewers had to go through the Dryden Aircraft Movie Collection on the research center’s website to see them. The current catalogue on YouTube is much easier to browse through, with clear playlist categories like supersonic aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. You can get a taste of what to expect from the page in the sample videos below.

[h/t Motherboard]

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