Morning Cup of Links: Bad Coffee

Tokyo's top 10 mythical beasts. I'm familiar with some of these, but no matter how much I looked, there was no Godzilla to be found. (via Boing Boing)
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Women Suck At Making Coffee: The Hilariously Misogynistic Supercut. Sure, it's funny now, but back in the day, it took us on another of a long lines of guilt trips.
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Belle Gunness: The Terror of La Porte. She murdered dozens of people right under the authorities' noses because no one wanted to believe a woman would do that.
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Eddie Murphy is on the shortlist of possible hosts for the next Academy Awards presentation. In fact, he's the only name on the list!
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Simon's Cat only wants to find out why this computer thing is so fascinating. The mouse, at least, is irresistible.
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Burning Man Has A Thunder Dome. No sign of Tina Turner or Mel Gibson, who apparently couldn't get tickets.
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6 ways Washington could create jobs. Vote for the idea you think is best, but strangely, you can only select one, while the government could implement them all.
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Ghost Cities of the Future. Nature is reclaiming some metropolitan areas whether we like it or not.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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