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The Weird Week in Review

Marijuana Truck Spill

A traffic accident in San Jose, California, led to a free-for-all. A truck crashed near Oakridge Mall around 1AM on Wednesday. The truck was left on its side, and bags of cargo spilled out the back. That cargo was pot, and passers-by, both drivers and pedestrians, rushed to grab their share. By the time police arrived, the truck driver and most of the marijuana was gone, and no one could give a description of the driver or of those taking the marijuana. There were other vehicles involved in the wreck, which left the truck blocking the intersection.

Girls Caught with Stolen Goat

Two girls, ages 6 and 7, were approached by police in Mankato, Minnesota when they were seen in their pajamas walking a goat at 11:30 PM. They told the officers that the goat lived in their bedroom closet and they walked it every night. The said the goat was hidden from their father, who didn't know their mother bought it two weeks earlier! The police didn't buy that story, and took the girls, who are stepsisters, home to talk to their parents. The mother explained that the girls had been to a birthday party that featured a petting zoo earlier that day. They had apparently liberated the goat and took it home with them.

Gardener's Face Impaled by Pruning Shears

Leroy Luetscher of Green Valley, Arizona, fell face-first while trying to pick up a pair of pruning shears in his garden a month ago. The handle of the garden tool went into his eye socket and down through his neck. He was rushed to the University Medical Center in Tucson, where doctors removed the shears and rebuilt the bottom of Luetscher's eye socket with metal mesh. The good news is that they were able to save his eye -and that the only picture with the story is an x-ray image. Luetscher has recovered, except for a slight swelling and mild double vision.

Busted by the Glove Box

Police in Hingham, Massachusetts, pulled over a car driven by 22-year-old Kaitlin Rymaszewski last Friday night. The officer suspected she had been drinking; even more so when he saw beer spilling out of the car's glove compartment! Rymaszewski said the beer was a gift from a friend to congratulate her on completing an alcohol treatment program. She had been ordered into the program after her arrest on drunk driving charges in March. Rymaszewski said she hid the beer in the glove box when she saw the blue lights behind her. She was arrested on second-offense drunk driving and other charges.

No Cutting in Line for Bank Robber

A man entered Eastern Bank in South Boston with the intention to rob it Thursday, but left empty-handed. He went to a teller and presented a note demanding money, but she said her window was closed. He went to the next window and received a scolding about cutting in line! Both the the teller and a customer berated the man about line cutting and told him to remove his hood. Instead, the man left the bank. Police said no one was injured and no weapon was shown. The robbery attempt is under investigation and no arrests have been made, police said.

FEMA Looks to Waffle House for Data

Craig Fugate, the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), knows a few things about how to assess damage in a disaster area. There's hard data, and then there's Waffle House.

First, there is the well-known Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Then there is what he calls the "Waffle House Index."

Green means the restaurant is serving a full menu, a signal that damage in an area is limited and the lights are on. Yellow means a limited menu, indicating power from a generator, at best, and low food supplies. Red means the restaurant is closed, a sign of severe damage in the area or unsafe conditions.

"If you get there and the Waffle House is closed?" FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate has said. "That's really bad. That's where you go to work."

There are 1,600 Waffle House outlets across the USA, and all try their best to feed customers even when conditions are difficult.

Man Catches Burglars from Overhead

Steven Lynn had never ridden in a small plane before, and his first time was a real adventure. He asked pilot David Hudson to fly over Lynn's home so he could photograph it from the air. When they got there, they saw two men taking items from the home! Hudson contacted the police by radio, and the small plane followed the burglars. The pilot kept the fleeing perpetrators in sight and gave directions until police could apprehend them. Two men were arrested and charged with burglary.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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