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Walt Disney's Secret Tragedy

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Disneyland may be the happiest place on earth, but the man behind it wasn’t. Behind the popular movies, the theme park empire and the Mouse, Walt Disney carried a tragedy with him that he refused to speak about even with his family members.

When Walt was growing up, his parents (that's Walt and his mom in the picture) were far from well off. They struggled to make ends meet, moving many times to pursue better job opportunities and trying to keep food in the mouths of five children.

So when Walt and his brother Roy were finally met with success, the brothers were proud to buy their parents a new home in North Hollywood, not far from Disney Studios. The elder Disneys had only been there a few months when Flora started to complain of headaches and said she felt constantly ill. Suspecting the furnace, Walt sent over a Disney Studios handyman to look into the matter. Whatever the handyman did, it wasn’t enough - one November morning, the housekeeper felt woozy and went to get the Disneys out of the house. Walt’s father, Elias, had collapsed in the hallway; Flora had fallen on the bathroom floor. They were able to revive Elias, but it was too late for Flora. She passed away from asphyxiation on November 26, 1938, at the age of 70.

To add insult to injury, Roy had an inspection done on the faulty furnace. Included in the write up were these particularly awful words: “installation of the furnace showed either a complete lack of knowledge of the requirements of the furnace or a flagrant disregard of these conditions if they were known.”

Walt felt terribly guilty and refused to talk about the matter for the rest of his life - to anyone. Even many years later, when his daughter asked where her grandparents were buried, he wouldn’t discuss it.

Many have speculated that Walt’s guilt over his mother fueled the tragic fates of the mothers in so many of his films, but the fact is, Disney borrowed a lot of his material from fairy tales. Apparently orphans or children with one parent just open up more plot lines.

[Photo via MiceChat]

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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