The Man Who Pressed His Luck ... and Won

CBS
CBS

In 1984, ice cream truck driver Michael Larson set a record by winning $110,237 (a combined total of cash and non-cash prizes) in one appearance on the game show Press Your Luck—and he did it by gaming the system. He had noticed that the Press Your Luck board did not rely on luck at all, but was actually running in five predictable patterns, which he memorized over the course of six weeks (with the help of a VCR). By the time the show's taping was completed, everyone from the host to the contestants were mystified by Larson's amazing ability to avoid the Whammy (the squares on the board which would end the player's turn) and consistently win prizes.

Larson's original appearance was aired as two episodes due to the length of his winning streak. Producers initially tried to avoid paying him, since his pattern-memorization might be considered cheating. Eventually, the producers relented, after determining that the official game rules did not prevent a player from reverse-engineering the game patterns. Indeed, producers later revealed in a documentary that they knew there was a weakness to the game (only having five board patterns without any randomness), but the weakness was ignored until Larson's famous performance. Furthermore, in order to get spins on the board, Larson had to answer trivia questions, which relied on his trivia skills.

The original Larson shows were aired in June of 1984, then were not seen again in their entirety for almost two decades. But they are on YouTube, along with a documentary about Larson's experience (the documentary also shows the great majority of the show video, along with extensive followup from everyone involved).

GAMING THE GAME SHOW

Watch in amazement as the humble Larson goes on a winning streak. Pay particular attention to his focus, and how he often appears to celebrate a victory at the moment he strikes the button, rather than the moment the prize is explained to him—indicating that he knows the pattern, and is happy when he successfully hits the button at the right time.

Below, the first episode ends with the player on the left holding his head in his hands.

EPILOGUE

Wikipedia has an extensive narrative about what happened to Larson after his win. The short version is that he lost part of his money in a bizarre scheme involving $1 bills and a radio game show, and he lost the remainder when his house was burgled (he reportedly had $40,000 in $1 bills in the house). Two years after winning, he was working as an assistant manager at Walmart.

Larson eventually became involved with an illegal lottery scheme and lived his remaining years on the run from the law, eventually dying from throat cancer in Apopka, Florida in 1999 at the age of 49. It's a sad story—and one that has been written about more extensively at Snopes. Larson's story was also discussed on an episode of This American Life.

Isaac Hempstead Wright Explains Bran Stark's Intense Staring in Game of Thrones

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

There's always been something off with Brandon Stark's empty stare that we see so often in Game of Thrones. This week, actor Isaac Hempstead Wright explained exactly how he pulls it off.

The 20-year-old went on Jimmy Kimmel Live! and shared a few of his experiences from working on the show, including accidentally dropping a spoiler in his math class and the interesting sex ed talk he was forced to have with his mom given his tender age when he began filming the show.

He also talked about his "intense stare"—and his preparation for the role may not be as deep as you think.

"I'm kind of getting good at this sort of intense stare," the star began. "But it's actually aided by the fact that I'm completely blind when I'm on set. I don't have my glasses, and I don't have contact lenses."

"How thick are the glasses?" Kimmel asks him, to which Hempstead Wright replies, "They're not that thick, but I need them to see."

He recalled another time when his vision problems aided his character. In season 7, while filming a scene with Sophie Turner (a.k.a. Sansa Stark), he recalled Turner making a comment along the lines of "Isaac, your stare is like—you're staring into my soul!" to which the actor replied "I can't see you!"

Actors—they're just like us.

Paranormal Investigator Lorraine Warren, Whose Life Inspired The Conjuring Films, Has Died at 92

Jason Kempin, Getty Images
Jason Kempin, Getty Images

Lorraine Warren, the paranormal investigator whose name and career were made famous by the Amityville haunted house legend of the 1970s and the recent Conjuring films, passed away Thursday at the age of 92.

According to the Connecticut Post, the news was announced by the New England Society for Psychic Research. Warren, along with her husband, Ed, spent 60 years investigating claims of paranormal activity, including ghosts, demonic possession, and other phenomena. Their interest was said to have stemmed from Ed’s childhood experience in a purportedly haunted home in Bridgeport, Connecticut. In the 1970s, the two began lecturing at colleges, discussing their cases and offering photos and audio recordings of seemingly inexplicable origin.

After declaring a home in Amityville, Long Island the site of demonic activity, it became the subject of several books and films. Their other cases have been explored in The Conjuring franchise, which began in 2013 and stars Vera Farmiga as Lorraine and Patrick Wilson as her husband. Ed Warren passed away in 2006.

[h/t Connecticut Post]

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