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14 Great Examples of Geeky Fine Art

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Fine art is alive and well, and artists often incorporate the fun aspects of pop culture—particularly the geek side of the spectrum.

1. Headless Chicken

Internet Week New York asked artists and students if they could draw the internet. The results were quite eclectic, but Barbara Ana Gomez’s submission nailed it on the head in a highly artistic manner.

2. It’s Murray Time

Casey Weldon made these portraits of Bill Murray playing all of Royal Tenenbaums for the “Bad Dads” art show at the Lopo gallery in San Francisco. Prints are available on his website.

3. Wisdom of the Llama

Apparently, Bill Murray is a good subject for geek painters, as evidenced by N.C. Winters' great portrait casting the actor in a religious light. Prints can be purchased at the Gallery 1988 website.

4. In The Garden of Audrey

Allison Sommers painted this renaissance-styled picture of Audrey from the Little Shop of Horrors for Gallery 1988’s “Crazy 4 Cult 5,” their fifth art show dedicated to cult classic films.

5. Da Doo Dionaea

For the same “Crazy 4 Cult 5” show, Scott Scheidly also painted a portrait of Audrey, although his version involved a detailed portrayal of her anatomy.

6. England 932 A.D.

If you’ve ever wondered what Monty Python and The Holy Grail would look like when portrayed in the art style of the time of the film’s setting, then Max Dalton’s contribution to the “Crazy 4 Cult 5” show should answer your question.

7. The First Goonie

This Goonies-inspired pirate piece was Eric Braddock’s submission into the “Crazy 4 Cult 5” show.

8. Hello, Mr. Skeksis

While the Dark Crystal may be one of the lesser-known Jim Henson films, the evil Skeksis are just scary (yet regal) enough to make a perfect subject for a geeky fine art painting. This wonderful creation was made by Leontine Greenberg.

9. Andy Dick

Gallery 1988 doesn’t limit its shows to cult movies. Their “Is This Thing On” show revolved around artist-interpretations of famous comedians. As far as fine art goes, none of the paintings were nearly as upscale as this rendition of Andy Dick as a sad clown by Chet Zar.

10. Prince Holds the Katamari On His Shoulders

Flickr user Everfalling created this cool bronze sculpture for one of his classes at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. It’s a seamless blending of the classic myth of Atlas and the delightfully non sequitur game of Katamari.

11. Ascension of the Kenny

This iconic portrait of Kenny was Beau Stanton’s contribution to the South Park 15th Anniversary Art Exhibition in at the Opera Gallery in New York. Laughing Squid’s Scott Beale has more great photos of the show for those interested.

12. Link

Perhaps one of the more underappreciated classic artistic creations are the gorgeous stained glass masterpieces that adorn the ancient chapels of Europe. In the geek renaissance, these artworks are getting the attention they deserve, thanks to stained glass artists like Lynda Macrae of The Glass House in Canada. Here you can see her beautiful version of the Link from Zelda recreated in stained glass, as designed by Kelli Nelson and photographed by Flickr user SevenCubed.

13. The Scream

To be fair, the last two on this list are not at all like the others. Instead of involving geek-subjects portrayed in fine art, they instead offer a classic fine art reimagined using geeky media.

This first piece shows Bernard Pras, who recreated Edvard Munch‘s classic painting, “The Scream,” through the use of electrical wiring, transistor circuit boards and a variety of recycled junk (including a Scream movie mask).

14. Oreo Cameos

These gorgeous and classical cameos are sculpted from the cream of Oreo cookies by artist Judith G. Klausner. I don’t think I’ve ever wanted to eat art so badly.

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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
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Knock-Off Versions of Nerf Ammo Can Cause Serious Eye Injuries
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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Nerf toy guns and their foam projectiles, as marketed and manufactured by Hasbro, are virtually harmless when used as instructed. But, as reported by CNN, a recent paper in the UK medical journal BMJ Case Reports is providing a reality check when it comes to using the mock weapons and off-brand ammo improperly.

Three unrelated patients were treated at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London with ocular injuries that were sustained as a result of being "shot" with Nerf guns. Two adults had bleeding and inflammation in the eye; one 11-year-old had bleeding, inflammation, and damage to the outer retinal layer. All three suffered what the paper described as "significant ocular trauma." Attending doctors treated their swelling, and all symptoms resolved within a few weeks.

So what happened? In the case of one patient, a Nerf play session went awry as a result of using non-licensed ammo that isn't subject to Hasbro's quality control measures and may be made of harder materials as a result. On their Nerf landing page, Hasbro cautions users to "never modify any Nerf blasters or other Nerf products. Use only the darts, water, rounds, and discs designed for specific Nerf blasters."

Pediatric ophthalmologists interviewed by CNN recommend that protective eyewear be used whenever anyone is playing with Nerf weapons. It's also advisable never to aim for the face when shooting and to avoid attempting to modify the weapons to shoot faster or farther.

[h/t CNN]

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Animals
Australian Charity Releases Album of Cat-Themed Ballads to Promote Feline Welfare
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An Australian animal charity is helping save the nation’s kitties one torch song at a time, releasing a feline-focused musical album that educates pet owners about how to properly care for their cats.

Around 35,000 cats end up in pounds, shelters, and rescue programs every year in the Australian state of New South Wales, according to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). Microchipping and fixing cats, along with keeping closer tabs on them, could help reduce this number. To get this message out, the RSPCA’s New South Wales chapter created Cat Ballads: Music To Improve The Lives Of Cats.

The five-track recording is campy and fur-filled, with titles like "Desex Me Before I Do Something Crazy" and "Meow Meow." But songs like “I Need You” might tug the heartstrings of ailurophiles with lyrics like “I guess that’s goodbye then/but you’ve done this before/the window's wide open/and so’s the back door/you might think I’m independent/but you’d be wrong.” There's also a special version of the song that's specifically designed for cats’ ears, featuring purring, bird tweets, and other feline-friendly noises.

Together, the tunes remind us how vulnerable our kitties really are, and provide a timely reminder for cat owners to be responsible parents to their furry friends.

“The Cat Ballads campaign coincides with kitten season, which is when our shelters receive a significantly higher number of unwanted kittens as the seasons change,” Dr. Jade Norris, a veterinary scientist with the RSPCA, tells Mental Floss. “Desexing cats is a critical strategy to reduce unwanted kittens.”

Listen to a song from Cat Ballads below, and visit the project’s website for the full rundown.

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