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Bed Time: 11 Imaginative Places to Sleep

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Creative beds aren't just for kids. People of all ages can enjoy a little imagination in the design of their sleeping chambers.

1. A Cuddly Page-Turner

If you love books and down comforters, Yusuke Suzuki’s Play Bed might just be the greatest bed ever. When the kids aren’t napping, they can flip the page and use all the fun cloth settings to create their own fantastic tales.

2. A Bookcase Bed

Karen Babel designed this bed as a perfect way to get the most use out of a limited amount of space. The bed is held up against the wall using a few cleverly designed bookshelves and when it’s needed, it can just be removed and pushed together to create a mattress. It might not be the most convenient way to put away a daily sleeper, but it would be great for visitors.

3. An Illuminated Sleeper

Even the coolest beds still tend to look rather boring once the lights are off. Philippe Boulet’s Poesy bed challenges that concept by giving the bed its own gorgeous lighting system that can change colors and intensity as needed. The result is a beautiful bed that can cast your romantic moods in the perfect light and wake you up with your favorite shade of sunrise.

4. A Rocking Frame

Water beds are a great way to fall asleep rocking on the waves of an imaginary ocean, but you’re in serious trouble if they spring a leak. For something a lot less dangerous, why not try a Private Cloud rocking bed?

5. A Tasty Treat

Kayla Kromer understands just how much Americans love burgers. We don’t just want to shove them in our faces—we want to crawl into our fast food favorites before dozing off to dream about milkshakes and French fries. While this would ordinarily be a rather greasy and stinky ordeal, Kromer’s cheeseburger bed allows us to relax under a lettuce sheet without any mess or fuss.

6. A Geeky Fantasy

Fast food isn’t Kayla Kromer’s only passion. She also enjoys great sci-fi films—or at least those that involve a certain Princess and her magical brother fighting off their corrupted father. For those who dream of gold bikinis, this Milennium Falcon bed is just the thing to set you off into your (dream) space.

7. A Nesting Space

Merav Eitan and Gas­ton Zahr created A Giant Birdsnest for Breeding New Ideas as part of the Green Gar­den Exhibition. What better way to get back to nature than to let your kids sleep like baby birds do? Of course, regurgitating their food for them is something best left up to the avian professionals.

8. A Queenly Coach

Here's one for every little girl who dreams of being a princess. PoshTots sells this fantasy coach bed at a price that only true princesses can afford—a staggering $47,000.

9. A Dreamy Playhouse

The Sweet Dream Bed is another option. It's cheaper, clocking in at anywhere from $5,000-$40,000, and instead of just getting a bed, your little princess also gets a gorgeous playhouse and an indoor slide.

10. An Igloo of Books

If you looked at those last two beds and asked yourself, “why are kiddos the only ones to get playhouses?,” Point Architects from Tokyo have you covered. The Uroko House is an adult’s playhouse adorned with some of the thinker’s favorite toys—books!

11. A Twisted Dreamspace

While this Roller Coaster Bed might not be the most comfortable thing on this list, it’s certainly the closest to a bed you might actually envision in your sleep. Cuban artists Los Carpinteros created the pieces to explore the limitations of our current interior design. To be fair, though, it’s probably easier to sleep in this bed than it is to find sheets for it.
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While these beds are fairly expensive and rare, it is possible to carve or paint fun designs on your bed frame. Are any of you sleeping on beds that are anything but normal?

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architecture
One Photographer's Quest to Document Every Frank Lloyd Wright Structure in the World
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From California’s Marin County Civic Center to the Yokodo Guest House in Ashiya City, Japan, Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence spans countries and continents. Today, 532 of the architect’s original designs remain worldwide—and one photographer is racking up the miles in an attempt to photograph each and every one of them, according to Architectural Digest.

Andrew Pielage is the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s unofficial photographer. The Phoenix-based shutterbug got his gig after friends introduced him to officials at Taliesin West, the late designer’s onetime winter home and studio that today houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Higher-ups at Taliesin West allowed Pielage to photograph the property in 2011, and they liked his work so much that they commissioned him for other projects. Since then, Pielage has shot around 50 Wright buildings, ranging from Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, to the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles.

Pielage takes vertical panoramas to “get more of Wright in one image,” and he also prefers to work with natural light to emphasize the way the architect integrated his structures to correspond with nature’s rhythms. While Pielage still has over 400 more FLW projects to go until he's done capturing the icon’s breadth of work, you can check out some of his initial shots below.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books

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