Weekend Links: Divers' Faces Poised For Success...ful Macros

Can pointing your car fob at your head make it work at a longer range? PC World tests "4 Stupid Tech Tricks," and the results are surprising (spoiler: yes, by the way, pointing it at your head does apparently work!)
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From my friend Thomas, pictorial profiles of joggers "before and after" their sprint. These further prove my hypothesis that no one ever looks happy when they run ...
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Chart the fascinating growth and change of Micky Mouse Through the Years. Which look is your favorite?
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Check out the incredible network of tunnels and chambers and the fascinating history of The Fleet – London’s Underground River.
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A few fantastic summer festivals from around the world such as this pirate display (that would make for a great "My Summer Vacation" story). Speaking of which, what have you Flossers been up to over these last few hot months?
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From Rob, this gallery of divers' faces frozen in action during the World Championships in Shanghai are all just macros waiting to happen.
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For those of you who fly often and (like me) might happen to be quite tall, consider this civil way to avoid strangling the airline passenger seated in front of you. (I think I'd still be too chicken to do it, though. I just dig my knees into their back if they recline and hope for the best).
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From Holly, a new report questioning "can playgrounds be too safe?" (NPR's news show "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me!" referenced this last week when host Peter Segal said, "In my day playgrounds were made from decommissioned WWII ordinance, and the merry-go-round was just a syphilitic whore named Mary who would spin you - and she was my best friend!)
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Stay tuned - more links tomorrow! In the meantime, send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com, and don't forget to follow me on Twitter, where I sometimes teach you Shakespearean insults.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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