23 Animals Relaxing With Cool Summer Treats

All across the country, people are hot and miserable. Perhaps this collection of adorable animals cooling off with icy snacks will help.


Swoyambhunath of Nepal is nicknamed “The Monkey Temple” for the sacred monkeys that live inside the complex. Flickr user lavenderstreak was able to capture these pampered primates in this delightful picture.

Flickr user Sudar Muthu was able to hand-feed ice cream to this adorable little guy during a trip to Eravikulam, Rajmalal National Park in India.


Just because cats, including tigers, can’t taste sweet stuff doesn’t mean they should be left out in this critter Popsicle party. Instead, they just need meat pops, like the one given to the tigers at the Sydney Zoo, as featured in this photo by Flickr user shutupyourface.


I’m not sure what kinds of fruits and nuts are in this bear’s treat, but he sure seems to like it. Flickr user Tambako The Jaguar caught this fun shot at the Tierpark Arth Goldau.


That’s right, lions, tigers and bears all enjoy cooling down with ice pops. This little guy was also shot at the Tierpark Arth Goldau by Flickr user Tambako The Jaguar. Like the tigers, lions also can’t taste sweets, so they have to satiate themselves with blood-filled treats.


Somehow this lemur got a hold of this ice cream cone just in time for Flickr user Ken McChesney to capture this great pic at the Edinburgh Zoo.


As the blog title says, Pandas Love to Party.


Flickr user TamanduaGirl likes to reward her pet anteater, Pua, with a cool yogurt and strawberry parfait.


Cute Overload reader Maria F.’s kitty likes to cool down with a few licks off of some delicious Häagen-Dazs bars. She says he doesn’t eat any of the chocolate, which is bad for kittens, but enjoys the creamy cool ice cream.

Snape here belongs to Flickr user Bridget Samuels. That’s a lot of ice cream for one little kitty.

This kitty not only has an adorable face while he enjoys his strawberry ice pop, he also has one of the best pet names ever—Circus McGircus. His owner, Cute Overload reader Whitney S., has some great taste in pet names.

Little Lucky is simply obsessed with this ice cream cone. I love how he doesn’t stop licking throughout the video.


If all Hawaiian dogs celebrate their birthdays the way Takota does, then we’d better not let our mainland pooches know. We’ll have a mutiny on our hands.

I don’t know the name of this adorable chihuahua shot by Flickr user boubou1, but he certainly knows how to celebrate Canada Day in style.


Flickr user flashb1t shot this cute gray parrot while he was munching on ice cream on a bike’s handlebars while his owner took a break from riding around town.

Gray parrots aren’t the only birds who enjoy ice cream. Flickr user billypalooza caught this cute peacock enjoying a sweet treat at the Denver Zoo.


Flickr user Radagast had a great trick to get her late pet mouse Meryl to take medicine—mix it in with ice cream.


It’s bad for bunnies to eat dairy products, but frozen raspberry puree is a great way for little Frankie to cool down on a hot day.

Flickr user rockamandy’s bunny Fry also enjoys the cooler things in life.


Wallabies aren’t big on ice cream, but they simply love the cones, particularly when they’re filled with tasty grains, as you can see in this cute picture by Flickr user Karen Hull.


Like wallabies, llamas love getting pellet treats served inside of ice cream cones as Flickr user Just Us 3 shows.
* * *
I’m ready to go grab a Fudgesicle. Do you guys ever give your critters icy treats when it’s hot outside?

Build Your Own Cat With These LEGO-Like Blocks

It’s one thing to commission a custom portrait of your pet, but it’s quite another to build a life-size sculpture of them yourself with more than a thousand LEGO-like bricks. That’s exactly what you can do with the cat sculptures made by the Hong Kong-based toy-brick-makers at JEKCA (“building blocks for kidults,” as the company describes itself).

The pet sculptures, which we spotted over on Bored Panda, come in the shape of various breeds and colors that allow you to choose one that looks uncannily like your own pet. As long as your cat looks like a typical orange tabby or tuxedo shorthair, Siamese, Persian, or other garden variety cat, at least. They come in different colors and are available in multiple positions, whether it’s sitting, walking, pouncing, or playing.

Made of more than 1200 individual bricks each, the cat sculptures run about a foot tall, and between about half a foot and a foot long, depending on whether they’re sitting, standing on their hind legs, or walking. They come with instructions for assembly and can be taken apart and built again as many times as you want. But you don’t have to worry about them falling apart, according to JEKCA, since the blocks are secured by screws. “These cats are like real sculptures and will not collapse or break apart,” the company writes on its Facebook.

Six different calico cat sculptures in different positions

You could build one that looks exactly like your cat or adopt one of the brick animals as a pet itself. Buy a whole team of them, and it’ll look like your house is overrun with a cat gang—minus the extreme litter box cleaning that comes with being a traditional crazy cat lady.

The cat sculptures cost between $60 and $90, plus shipping, depending on the size of the kit and how many bricks it requires. You can see them all here. If cats aren’t your favorite pet, the company also makes dogs, birds, and other animals as well. Although, sadly, unlike their domestic pets, their dolphins and deer don’t come in life-size versions.

[h/t Bored Panda]

Aflac's Robotic Duck Comforts Kids with Cancer

Every year, close to 16,000 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with cancer. That news can be the beginning of a long and draining battle that forces kids and their parents to spend large amounts of time with medical providers, enduring long and sometimes painful treatments. As The Verge reports, a bit of emotional support during that process might soon come from an unlikely source: the Alfac duck.

The supplemental insurance company announced at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) that it has partnered with the medical robotics company Sproutel to design and manufacture My Special Aflac Duck, a responsive and emotive sim-bird intended exclusively for children undergoing cancer treatment.

When a child cuddles the fuzzy robotic duck, it can cuddle back. It reacts to being cradled and stroked by quacking or moving its head. Kids can also touch special RFID chips emblazoned with emoji on the duck's chest to tell it how they’re feeling, and the device will mimic those emotions.

But the duck isn’t solely for cuddling. In “IV Mode,” which can be switched on while a child is undergoing IV therapy, the duck can help the user relax by guiding them through breathing exercises. Accessories included with the toy also allow children to "draw blood" from the duck as well as administer medication, a kind of role-playing that may help patients feel more comfortable with their own treatments.

Aflac approached Sproutel with the idea after seeing Sproutel’s Jerry the Bear, a social companion robot intended to support kids with diabetes. Other robotic companions—like the Japanese-made seal Paro and Hasbro's Joy for All companion pets for seniors—have hinted at a new market for robotics that prioritize comfort over entertainment or play.

My Special Aflac Duck isn’t a commercial product and won’t be available for retail sale. Aflac intends to offer it as a gift directly to patients, with the first rollout expected at its own cancer treatment center in Atlanta, Georgia. Mass distribution is planned for later this year.

[h/t The Verge]


More from mental floss studios