Weekend Links: Wherein a Black Hole Eats a Star

This is probably the closest thing to an "awww kitteh" link you'll ever get from me (not because I don't love them, but I try to hold myself to some kind of standard!): Introducing the Sand Cat. Look past its devilishly cute face to behold one of the few creatures who can live in the hottest and driest deserts on Earth.
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Our galaxy (and beyond!) is choreographed in exquisite orbital patterns - there is more mathematical harmony and beautiful geometrical relationships than we realize.
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But of course, don't dance too near the fire: see how Astronomers have tracked a star's final moments as it was shred to bits by "wandering too closely" to a black hole.
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Another edition of "too close for comfort" (this would be dental floss … used. Yuck! But I had to use the floss. I had to!)
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Hollywood has honored a few teachers in its films as being inspiring, sometimes culture-changing figures. Then there are those on the opposite end of the spectrum: here is a list of greatest flawed movie teachers, from bad to worse.
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How do you feel about the verbing of English? We say things now like "Googling" without batting an eye. But the English language is ever weird and ever changing, and this poem on "verbing" speaks to all of that.
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I recently travelled out of the country for the first time, and was interested to see that the age-old argument about how American paper currency being better off if it incorporated more color and different sizes made a lot of sense in world context! Here are some clever bank note designs, and whether you agree with these or not, how do you feel about the larger issue? And who here remembers the disaster that was the Sacagawea dollar?
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Speaking of international currency, what about a difference in international animals? Here is a guide to how a variety of languages experience animal sound, plus a listening guide for those who want more!
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More links tomorrow! In the meantime, remember to send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com, and don't forget to follow me on Twitter (@FlossyAlli) where sometimes I link to really exceptionally pretty pictures.

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Homophones
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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN

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