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He Put the "Tupper" in Tupperware

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Home parties are everywhere now - Longaberger, Avon, Mary Kay, Silpada, Pampered Chef - and those are just the ones my mom has had in the past year .(I kid. She'll kill me when she reads this.) But none of those companies would exist today if Earl Tupper hadn't patterned some polyethylene after a paint can lid.

Tupper was working for the plastics division of DuPont during WWII, but became interested in finding a peacetime use for the company's polyethylene once the war was over.

Tupper tried the material in various molds (he had amassed an interesting personal collection of molding machines) and tinkered with the formula until he found a perfect consistency for dishes and dinnerware. He developed Tupperware's signature airtight lid by observing how well a paint can lid kept its contents fresh and duplicating it in plastic. Keen observations like these made Tupper's "Wonderbowls" the winner of numerous design contests; the dishes were even sold at a standalone store on Fifth Avenue in New York. Still, Tupper just wasn't making any real money on his product... and then there was Brownie.

An extroverted single mom, Brownie Wise's sales of Tupperware single-handedly outdid the sales at the actual Tupperware store. When Tupper found out about her "home party" method of sales - essential for demonstrating that patented Tupperware "burp" seal - he promoted her to vice president of the company. The duo were extremely successful until they had a falling out and Tupper abruptly booted her from the company in the late '50s. She left with just a year's advance salary and no stock holdings; Tupper sold Tupperware Home Parties — Brownie's division — for $16 million about a year later. He also divorced his wife and bought an island (and you thought a mid-life crisis Porsche was bad).

Just because he was done with the 'ware, Tupper didn't exactly retire. He had so many inventions in his brain he had to carry a notebook at all times to keep them straight. Among his ideas: a "Bite and Wound Sucker," assorted combs and a no-drip ice cream cone. As you can probably guess, none of them quite reached the same success as Tupperware.

The Carrot Test

Ding dong! Carrot calling! Long before Avon patented their "Avon calling" catchphrase, Tupperware saleswomen were practicing "Carrot calling," a technique that challenged women to put carrots in Tupperware instead of where they usually stored veggies to see which method kept them fresh longer. Parties were often booked after it became evident how much better the carrots fared in Tupperware.

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Animals
Welcome to Italy's 'Snail Spa,' Where Happy Mollusks Ooze Prized Slime
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Wellness fads may come and go, but one beauty trend—using gross unguents to maintain a youthful glow—remains constant. Throughout history, cultures around the world have slathered themselves in concoctions containing everything from crocodile excrement to bird droppings and even snail slime, the last of which was favored by the ancient Greeks and Romans.

Today, mollusk mucous is undergoing a surprising resurgence, as cosmetics companies around the globe use the slime to make skin products. To harvest mass quantities of the clear ooze, snail farmers typically have to kill the tiny creatures. But according to Great Big Story's video below, an Italian man named Simone Sampò invented a snail slime extraction machine—which he has dubbed a "snail spa"—that sprays the critters with secret ingredients, pleasuring them to the point that they secrete their valuable ooze.

Curious how the natural lubricant gets from a mollusk's foot to a well-cared-for face? Watch Sampò's steam machine in action below, as it lulls a bevy of happy snails into producing jugs of slime.

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Creating a Water-Powered Hammer Using Stone Age Tools
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A "Monjolo" is a water-powered hammer made from a log and some sticks. It relies on flowing water from a stream to do its work.

In the video below, the anonymous laborer who goes by Primitive Technology on YouTube creates his own Monjolo from scratch. It's effectively a hollowed-out log placed in the path of a stream, supported by a structure of skinny beams. As the log fills up with water, it rises, then the water drains out the back and it comes crashing down again. When it crashes down, that's an opportunity for a hammer head on the end to do something useful—like crushing charcoal or grain.

The creator of Primitive Technology writes:

This is the first machine I’ve built using primitive technology that produces work without human effort. Falling water replaces human calories to perform a repetitive task. A permanent set up usually has a shed protecting the hammer and materials from the weather while the trough end sits outside under the spout. This type of hammer is used to pulverise grain into flour and I thought I might use one to mill dry cassava chips into flour when the garden matures. ...

Like all the Primitive Technology videos, this is done entirely without spoken or written language, and it's DIY paradise. Tune in for a look into what one man alone in the bush can create:

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