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The 10 Geekiest Lego Creations

I know, to some extent, all Lego creations made by anyone over the age of 10 are a little geeky, but it takes things to a whole new level of nerdiness to create something based on your favorite sci-fi movie or video game. Even so, the hardest part of writing this article wasn’t coming up with 10 amazingly geeky creations, but deciding which ones not to include. That’s why aside from the geekiness of the subject matter, I had to take into account how much work each project took to make a reality. After all, if there’s anything geekier than a nerdy Lego creation, it’s taking an unbelievable amount of time to construct said design.

Mario Brothers Animation

Making a Mario screen out of your favorite interlocking brick toys is pretty geeky, but taking the extra step to turn the design into a stop motion animation is what makes this Mario Brothers Lego project stand out from the crowd.

Thriller Video

What could be better than a stop-motion Lego recreation of one of the world’s favorite video games? How about a 13 minute long, shot-for-shot remake of one of the most memorable music videos ever created? The dancing might not be as good as the original, but you have to admit, they still have pretty good moves for minifigs.

The Dark Knight Trailer

There are tons of Lego-animated videos on the net, but this one earns a spot on this list thanks to the incredible editing done to really make the shot-for-shot remake of the trailer look like a perfect (albeit Lego-ized) copy of the original. This just might be the most epic-looking Lego video I’ve seen so far.

The Matrix Bullet Scene

This video, made in celebration of the tenth anniversary of the release of the first Matrix movie, took over 440 hours to make. Scene by scene, the quality shows and even those that aren’t fans of the film are certain to be impressed with the level of detail put into filming this incredible Lego remake.

Monty Python’s Crimson Permanent Assurance

If you’ve seen “Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life,” then you’ll remember the introductory scene filled with accountant pirates performing hostile takeovers of other companies. Flickr user gotoAndLego’s Lego recreation of the company’s pirate ship is delightfully faithful to the original –it even includes working interior lights.

M.C. Escher’s Relativity

Andrew Lipson and Daniel Shiu have done a few faithful recreations of MC. Escher pictures, but their massive stairway-filled labyrinth created after Escher’s “Relativity” is my favorite. On Lipson's website, he attempts to explain how the feat was mastered, but personally, I like to remain in the dark, so the illusion seems all that much more mystical.

Star Wars Jawa Sandcrawler

Yes, there are tons of Lego Star Wars works (some of them are even officially manufactured by Lego), but how many of these actually light up, move on their own and can pick up droids? Equally impressive: Marshal Banana’s 10,000-piece LEGO sandcrawler has a fully detailed interior complete with a host of characters from the movie. That’s why this one stands out even with so much competition.

Pinball Machine

While the raised bumps on a Lego brick make them seem like a less-than-ideal material for building a pinball machine, Gerrit Bronsveld and Martijn Boogaarts were able to challenge that idea with a 20,000 block machine that took over 300 hours to complete. While the standard metal ball proved too heavy for the Lego motor, the creators were able to substitute a glass ball in its place and the game was all the rage at the LegoWorld exhibition in the Netherlands where it was debuted.

The Most Useless Machine

While most machines are made to accomplish some type of task, the most useless machine ever was created solely for the sake of creation. If that weren’t a geeky enough objective, the entire point of the Lego version was to create something that existed solely for the point of creating it…in Lego.

Rubik’s Cube Solver

Yes, you read that right. This amazing Lego machine uses custom-made software and a Lego motor to rotate and solve Rubik’s Cubes. The future of geekery is now.

I’m sure any Lego fans reading this will have their own favorite geeky creations. If you’re one of those Lego lovers, feel free to share your links and stories of the geekiest Lego creation you’ve ever seen or made.

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Build Your Own Harry Potter Characters With LEGO's New BrickHeadz Set

Harry Potter is looking pretty square these days. In a testament to the enduring appeal of the boy—and the franchise—who lived, LEGO has launched a line of Harry Potter BrickHeadz.

The gang’s all here in this latest collection, which was recently revealed during the toymaker’s Fall 2018 preview in New York City. Other highlights of that show included LEGO renderings of characters from Star Wars, Incredibles 2, and several Disney films, according to Inside The Magic.

The Harry Potter BrickHeadz collection will be released in July and includes figurines of Harry, Hermione, Ron, Dumbledore, and even Hedwig. Some will be sold individually, while others come as a set.

A Ron Weasley figurine
LEGO

A Hermione figurine
LEGO

A Dumbledore figurine
LEGO

Harry Potter fans can also look forward to a four-story, 878-piece LEGO model of the Hogwarts Great Hall, which will be available for purchase August 1. Sets depicting the Whomping Willow, Hogwarts Express, and a quidditch match will hit shelves that same day.

[h/t Inside The Magic]

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Is There a Limit to How Many Balls You Can Juggle?
Carl Court, Getty Images
Carl Court, Getty Images

In 2017, a juggler named Alex Barron broke a record when he tossed 14 balls into the air and caught them each once. The feat is fascinating to watch, and it becomes even more impressive once you understand the physics behind it.

As WIRED explains in a new video, juggling any more than 14 balls at once may be physically impossible. Researchers who study the limits of juggling have found that the success of a performance relies on a number of different components. Speed, a.k.a. the juggler's capacity to move their hands in time to catch each ball as it lands, is a big one, but it's not the most important factor.

What really determines how many balls one person can juggle is their accuracy. An accurate juggler knows how to keep their balls from colliding in midair and make them land within arm's reach. If they can't pull that off, their act falls apart in seconds.

Breaking a juggling world record isn't the same as breaking a record for sprinting or shot put. With each new ball that's added to the routine, jugglers need to toss higher and move their hands faster, which means their throws need to be significantly more accurate than what's needed with just one ball fewer. And skill and hours of practice aren't always enough; according to expert jugglers, the current world records were likely made possible by a decent amount of luck.

For a closer look at the physics of juggling, check out the video below.

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