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The 10 Geekiest Lego Creations

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I know, to some extent, all Lego creations made by anyone over the age of 10 are a little geeky, but it takes things to a whole new level of nerdiness to create something based on your favorite sci-fi movie or video game. Even so, the hardest part of writing this article wasn’t coming up with 10 amazingly geeky creations, but deciding which ones not to include. That’s why aside from the geekiness of the subject matter, I had to take into account how much work each project took to make a reality. After all, if there’s anything geekier than a nerdy Lego creation, it’s taking an unbelievable amount of time to construct said design.

Mario Brothers Animation

Making a Mario screen out of your favorite interlocking brick toys is pretty geeky, but taking the extra step to turn the design into a stop motion animation is what makes this Mario Brothers Lego project stand out from the crowd.

Thriller Video

What could be better than a stop-motion Lego recreation of one of the world’s favorite video games? How about a 13 minute long, shot-for-shot remake of one of the most memorable music videos ever created? The dancing might not be as good as the original, but you have to admit, they still have pretty good moves for minifigs.

The Dark Knight Trailer

There are tons of Lego-animated videos on the net, but this one earns a spot on this list thanks to the incredible editing done to really make the shot-for-shot remake of the trailer look like a perfect (albeit Lego-ized) copy of the original. This just might be the most epic-looking Lego video I’ve seen so far.

The Matrix Bullet Scene

This video, made in celebration of the tenth anniversary of the release of the first Matrix movie, took over 440 hours to make. Scene by scene, the quality shows and even those that aren’t fans of the film are certain to be impressed with the level of detail put into filming this incredible Lego remake.

Monty Python’s Crimson Permanent Assurance

If you’ve seen “Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life,” then you’ll remember the introductory scene filled with accountant pirates performing hostile takeovers of other companies. Flickr user gotoAndLego’s Lego recreation of the company’s pirate ship is delightfully faithful to the original –it even includes working interior lights.

M.C. Escher’s Relativity

Andrew Lipson and Daniel Shiu have done a few faithful recreations of MC. Escher pictures, but their massive stairway-filled labyrinth created after Escher’s “Relativity” is my favorite. On Lipson's website, he attempts to explain how the feat was mastered, but personally, I like to remain in the dark, so the illusion seems all that much more mystical.

Star Wars Jawa Sandcrawler

Yes, there are tons of Lego Star Wars works (some of them are even officially manufactured by Lego), but how many of these actually light up, move on their own and can pick up droids? Equally impressive: Marshal Banana’s 10,000-piece LEGO sandcrawler has a fully detailed interior complete with a host of characters from the movie. That’s why this one stands out even with so much competition.

Pinball Machine

While the raised bumps on a Lego brick make them seem like a less-than-ideal material for building a pinball machine, Gerrit Bronsveld and Martijn Boogaarts were able to challenge that idea with a 20,000 block machine that took over 300 hours to complete. While the standard metal ball proved too heavy for the Lego motor, the creators were able to substitute a glass ball in its place and the game was all the rage at the LegoWorld exhibition in the Netherlands where it was debuted.

The Most Useless Machine

While most machines are made to accomplish some type of task, the most useless machine ever was created solely for the sake of creation. If that weren’t a geeky enough objective, the entire point of the Lego version was to create something that existed solely for the point of creating it…in Lego.

Rubik’s Cube Solver

Yes, you read that right. This amazing Lego machine uses custom-made software and a Lego motor to rotate and solve Rubik’s Cubes. The future of geekery is now.

I’m sure any Lego fans reading this will have their own favorite geeky creations. If you’re one of those Lego lovers, feel free to share your links and stories of the geekiest Lego creation you’ve ever seen or made.

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Minh Hoang, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
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The 5 Most Valuable Pokemon Cards
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Minh Hoang, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

As a teenager, Pokemon creator Satoshi Tajiri was so fond of collecting insects that classmates called him “Mr. Bug.” While it might not have been an affectionate label, Tajiri had the last laugh: His Pokemon video game, originally released for the Nintendo Game Boy in 1996, has become an enduring multimedia success, selling billions in games, merchandise, and phone apps.

The goal of collecting and pitting monsters against one another has been particularly appealing for trading card collectors, who have created an entire secondary market for the low-tech version of the game. First editions, misprints, and other characteristics all affect value. If you’re curious, take a look at the five most valuable Pokemon cards according to Heritage Auctions and other sources.

1. PIKACHU ILLUSTRATOR

A Pikachu Illustrator card
stephychu025, eBay

One of the earliest cards to come out of the Pokemon franchise was this promotional card of Pikachu that was given out to winners of an illustration contest in 1998. An estimated 20 to 39 copies were issued. In late 2016, Heritage Auctions sold one for a whopping $54,970. In 2017, an eBay seller was asking $100,000 for a card graded by professional authenticators to be in virtually perfect condition.

2. CHARIZARD

A first edition Charizard Pokemon card
bakemat_0, eBay

This dragon-esque creature was first seen in 1999. Nearly 20 years later, a perfect “10” graded card sold for $11,999.  

3. MASTER’S KEY PRIZE CARD

A Pokemon Master's Key card
ebirdman, eBay

Given out during a 2010 card championship in Japan, only 34 copies of the Master's Key Prize Card are thought to exist. The scarcity helps the cards fetch four figures when they're spotted on the open market.

4. PRE-RELEASE RAICHU

A Pokemon Raichu card
sken1851, eBay

Collectors love cards that were never intended for public distribution, and this Raichu card fits the bill. Although unconfirmed, Pokemon lore has it that product distributor Wizards of the Coast made just 10 of these Raichu cards for their employees and stamped “pre release” on the front. While it’s rarely offered for sale, collectors believe it can fetch up to $10,000.

5. POKEMON SNAP CARDS

A Pokemon Snap card
base_set_sales, eBay

In a bit of product synergy, Nintendo’s 1999 N64 game, Pokemon Snap, ran a promotion in which players could take a “candid” shot of Pokemon in the game and send it in to a Japanese magazine. Winners would have the image placed on a card. Due to their rarity, the Snaps have reportedly sold for over $8000.

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Radio Flyer
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Pop Culture
Tiny Star Wars Fans Can Now Cruise Around in Their Very Own Landspeeders
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Radio Flyer

Some kids collect Hot Wheels, while others own model lightsabers and dream of driving Luke Skywalker’s Landspeeder through a galaxy far, far away. Soon, Mashable reports, these pint-sized Jedis-in-training can pilot their very own replicas of the fictional anti-gravity craft: an officially licensed, kid-sized Star Wars Landspeeder, coming in September from American toy company Radio Flyer.

The Landspeeder has an interactive dashboard with light-up buttons, and it plays sounds from the original Star Wars film. The two-seater doesn’t hover, exactly, but it can zoom across desert sands (or suburban sidewalks) at forward speeds of up to 5 mph, and go in reverse at 2 mph.

The vehicle's rechargeable battery allows for around five hours of drive time—just enough for tiny Star Wars fans to reenact their way through both the original 1977 movie and 1980’s The Empire Strikes Back. (Sorry, grown-up sci-fi nerds: The toy ride supports only up to 130 pounds, so you’ll have to settle for pretending your car is the Death Star.)

Radio Flyer’s Landspeeder will be sold at Toys “R” Us stores. It costs $500, and is available for pre-order online now.

Watch it in action below:

[h/t Mashable]

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