Morning Cup of Links: Rage Rhapsody

Göbekli Tepe was built 11,600 years ago, before the pyramids, before Stonehenge, and before anything else we've found. The ancient temple in Turkey hints that religion, and not agriculture, caused the birth of civilization.
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Andy Graulund made a rage face comic to the lyrics of Bohemian Rhapsody. It didn't take long for a music video to be made from it.
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Last year, we brought you the story of heiress Huguette Clark and the controversy over who controls her fortune. Clark died yesterday at age 104, and the investigation into her finances continues. (via Metafilter)
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Does the Person You're Talking to Want to Hear About Your Dream? You could give a simple answer (no), but it's more fun to follow a flowchart. (via Buzzfeed)
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For the class of 2011, lowered expectations may be the only way to get a job after graduation. A response from a 25-year-old writer makes the Lost Generation sound a lot like the Baby Boomers.
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Firemen use the Jaws of Life to rescue a baby fawn stuck in a pile of rocks. The reunion with his mama will touch your heart.
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10 Facts About Wrigley Field. Tradition can carry a team even when their talent can't.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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