Weekend Links: Cinematic Sand Sculptures

While the illegal replication and distribution of media is extremely prevalent these days, video game creators have decided they’re not gonna take it anymore. These 6 Hilarious Ways Game Designers Are Screwing With Pirates show a few ways they’re fighting back. (Some language NSFW.)
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John Lamouranne is an artist – and eggs are his canvas. If you haven’t had enough of eggs this weekend, be sure to check out his egg-ceptional creations, which include The Beatles, the Toy Story gang, and Chucky from Child’s Play (of course). BTW I’m so sorry for that “egg-ceptional” pun. It was really an egg-xample of bad judgment. (Via Slash Food)
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Thanks to reader David E. for passing along this list of 18 Exquisite Cinematic Sand Sculptures. I've got a lot to live up to at the beach this summer. [Image credit.]
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Until today I have never once in my life thought “Hey, I’d really like a cake in a jar.” But now, after seeing this post with 8 amazing jar cakes, I actually realize just how empty and jar cake-less my life has been all these years.
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If you’ve never enjoyed the witty delight that is McSweeney’s, it’s time you start. The recent piece "Corrections to Last Night’s Party" is pretty great. And the very funny (and all too realistic) "I Am Seeking to Destroy My Deep-Seated Cynicism and Ironic Detachment Via A Strict Regimen of Self-Inflicted Enthusiasm!" Is one of my favorite titles ever.
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Right-leaning people who have wished for Stephen Colbert to just disappear just may get their wish, because the conservative-mocking comedian is heading for the Bermuda Triangle.
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Nerve has compiled a list of all of the major characters from The Office (America Version) and ranked them in order of funniness. I appreciate the effort, but I cry major foul that Creed isn't #1 by a mile. Your thoughts? (Via The Daily What)
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Are you a crappy writer? Why not make it official – with paper made out of elephant “leavings.”
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And finally, Smithsonian unmasks the mystery behind a famous Earth Day photo.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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