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13 Exquisite Easter Eggs

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Easter time is upon us all and whether or not you celebrate, you can still appreciate the artistry that goes into many Easter eggs. Here are a few of my favorite designs from all over the world.

1. Pysanky Easter Eggs

Also known as Ukrainian Easter eggs, these stunning shapes are applied not with dyes or paint, but with carefully applied beeswax. A wooden tool, called a ‘kistka' is used to apply the wax. Although the most common Pysanky eggs are those using patterns, like the one above by Wikipedia user Lubap, the methods can be used to create all variety of designs, including this amazing recreation of Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

2. Cross Stitched Eggs

Ukrainian Easter eggs are known throughout the world for their complex designs and beautiful artwork, but Ukrainian artist Forostyuk Inna decided to forgo the usual wax and dye methods and opted to cross stitch her eggs instead. No one seems to be quite sure about the methods she used to create these cool designs, but that only serves to make them that much more incredible.

3. Carved Emu Eggs

The emu egg shell naturally has three layers of color, ranging from white to teal to a deep green that often appears black. By taking advantage of these layers, artist Gary LeMaster is able to create intricately detailed and colorful egg creations with nothing more than a set of carving tools. He also works with all other types of eggs, including regular old chicken eggs, adapting his style to suit the egg type and design accordingly.

4. Celebrity Eggs

When it comes to Easter eggs featuring celebrity images, one name stands out above all the rest. Artist John Lamoroni does amazing egg portraits of everyone from President Obama to Elton John. My personal favorite is this wonderful piece featuring the characters from Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland.

5. Kiss Easter Eggs

Who says you have to be an professional artist to create eggs that everyone will remember? Flickr user Rakka created these unforgettable rock star eggs with nothing more than a bit of creativity and a set of markers.

6. The Egg Bot

Not only do you not have to be a professional artist to create amazing egg designs, you don’t even have to be a human. The Egg Bot is a specially designed invention that serves only one purpose—to decorate eggs and other rounded objects. While this may not sound all that impressive, the selection of its completed projects is (a handful of these projects are seen above).

7. Geode Easter Eggs

Perhaps you like your eggs a little more exotic, but 100% natural. If so, these geode eggs are something you can easily make at home using a few simple ingredients you already have at home.

8. Chalkboard Eggs

If you’re looking for another simple Easter egg project that your kids can enjoy, these chalkboard eggs featured on Skip to My Lou are a great option. Just cover eggs with chalkboard paint and let your little ones write and draw on them with their chalk.

9. Lucha Libre Eggs

You may think eggs are fragile, but these masked warriors can certainly hold their own in a fight. If you want to make your own luchadore eggs, Diary of a Crafty Chica has a great tutorial to guide you.

10. Battlestar Galactegga

For the sci fi geeks in our audience, these Battlestar Galactica eggs are a good way to celebrate your interests while still following holiday traditions. Geeks Are Sexy has some great tips for making your own, but your results will most certainly vary based on your own artistic talents.

11. World of Warcraft Easter Eggs

The world of World of Warcraft might be full of fun Easter eggs, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make literal Easter eggs based on the game’s characters. Be sure to check out the awesome Noblegarden Contest winning egg designs.

12. Knitted Easter Eggs

Not everyone likes to eat eggs, and it seems like a waste to decorate real eggs if you don’t want to eat them. Fortunately, these knitted Easter eggs by Purl Bee provide a vegan-friendly alternative that also has the benefit of being a lot less fragile.

13. Felted Eggs

While these eggs seen on Craftzine may look like they don’t use actual eggs, the shell is actually a crucial part of the felted nest structure. The felted wool is simply formed around the exterior of a very carefully cut egg.
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If you’re looking for more Easter egg decorating goodness, be sure to check out Miss C’s article from a few years ago that also has links to instructions for creating your own awesome designs. If you have any links to your own favorite artistically inclined eggs though, please feel free to share the links in the comments.

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IA Collaborative
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Design
Lovely Vintage Manuals Show How to Design for the Human Body
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IA Collaborative

If you're designing something for people to hold and use, you probably want to make sure that it will fit a normal human. You don't want to make a cell phone that people can't hold in their hands (mostly) or a vacuum that will have you throwing out your back every time you clean the house. Ergonomics isn't just for your office desk setup; it's for every product you physically touch.

In the mid-1970s, the office of legendary industrial designer Henry Dreyfuss created a series of manuals for designers working on products that involved the human body. And now, the rare Humanscale manuals from Henry Dreyfuss Associates are about to come back into print with the help of a Kickstarter campaign from a contemporary design firm. Using the work of original Henry Dreyfuss Associates designers Niels Diffrient and Alvin R. Tilley, the guides are getting another life with the help of the Chicago-based design consultancy IA Collaborative.

A Humanscale page illustrates human strength statistics.

The three Humanscale Manuals, published between 1974 and 1981 but long out-of-print, covered 18 different types of human-centric design categories, like typical body measurements, how people stand in public spaces, how hand and foot controls should work, and how to design for wheelchair users within legal requirements. In the mid-20th century, the ergonomics expertise of Dreyfuss and his partners was used in the development of landmark products like the modern telephones made by Bell Labs, the Polaroid camera, Honeywell's round thermostat, and the Hoover vacuum.

IA Collaborative is looking to reissue all three Humanscale manuals which you can currently only find in their printed form as historic documents in places like the Cooper Hewitt design museum in New York. IA Collaborative's Luke Westra and Nathan Ritter worked with some of the original designers to make the guides widely available again. Their goal was to reprint them at a reasonable price for designers. They're not exactly cheap, but the guides are more than just pretty decor for the office. The 60,000-data-point guides, IA Collaborative points out, "include metrics for every facet of human existence."

The manuals come in the form of booklets with wheels inside the page that you spin to reveal standards for different categories of people (strong, tall, short, able-bodied, men, women, children, etc.). There are three booklets, each with three double-sided pages, one for each category. For instance, Humanscale 1/2/3 covers body measurements, link measurements, seating guide, seat/table guide, wheelchair users, and the handicapped and elderly.

A product image of the pages from Humanscale Manual 1/2/3 stacked in a row.

"All products––from office chairs to medical devices—require designs that 'fit' the end user," according to Luke Westra, IA Collective's engineering director. "Finding the human factors data one needs to achieve these ‘fits' can be extremely challenging as it is often scattered across countless sources," he explains in a press release, "unless you've been lucky enough to get your hands on the Humanscale manuals."

Even setting aside the importance of the information they convey, the manuals are beautiful. Before infographics were all over the web, Henry Dreyfuss Associates were creating a huge compendium of visual data by hand. Whether you ever plan to design a desk chair or not, the manuals are worthy collectors' items.

The Kickstarter campaign runs from July 25 to August 24. The three booklets can be purchased individually ($79) or as a full set ($199).

All images courtesy IA Collaborative

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Theo Rindos
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Graphic Designer Visualizes America's Major Rivers as Subway Routes
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Theo Rindos

Mark Twain spent his early years navigating America's winding waterways, but the steamboat pilot-turned-author was also a fan of modern transportation: He was one of the first passengers to ride the London Underground's longest tube line—the Central Line—when it first opened in 1900. Needless to say, Twain would probably be a fan of the map below, which visualizes U.S. rivers as subway lines.

A map depicting U.S. rivers as subway routes, by graphic designer Theo Rindos
Theo Rindos
 
 
A map depicting U.S. rivers as subway routes, by graphic designer Theo Rindos
Theo Rindos

Created by graphic designer Theo Rindos (and spotted by CityLab), the map is inspired by Harry Beck's original London Tube map from the 1930s. It's based on data culled from the U.S. Geological Survey, Google Maps, and Wikipedia.

"I have always been fascinated by transit maps and river systems, and I thought, 'Why not put them together?'" Rindos tells Mental Floss. Beck's design style "has been kind of a staple for many city transit systems because it's so easy to understand and is so beautiful. The rivers of the United States are complex, and I wanted to see if I could achieve a similar outcome."

The source of each river is denoted with a solid-colored circle. White circles indicate where these waterways converge and split, and neighboring cities and towns are marked as "stations." That said, the map doesn't feature every single U.S. river: It includes ones important to the transportation and shipping sectors, but for aesthetic reasons, Rindos opted to leave out awkwardly shaped rivers and turned smaller ones into bus routes.

You can purchase Rindos' map here, or visit the designer's website to learn more about his work.

[h/t CityLab]

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