CLOSE

The Weird Week in Review

Innovative, But Illegal

Police in Lincoln, Nebraska arrested 40-year-old William Logan Jr. on a misdemeanor theft charge. Logan was caught on surveillance camera using a vacuum to suck change out of coin laundry appliances. Detectives went to the home where Logan lived with his father, who recognized him from the surveillance photos right off. Logan only retrieved about $20 from the machines at an apartment laundry room. Logan was known to local authorities from previous arrests, including a conviction for stealing a Christmas tree from the Salvation Army.

Rain of Worms

Teacher David Crichton was holding a physical education class outdoors in Galashiels, Scotland, last week when worms began raining from the sky.

The boys heard a "soft thudding" on the artificial pitch - then looked up to see dozens of worms plummeting from the sky.

David, 26, said he and other teachers at Galashiels Academy were baffled by the incident.

And they later found more worms spread across a school tennis court almost 100 yards from the pitch. He said: "We started hearing this wee thudding noise. There were about 20 worms on the ground.

School staff eventually found about 120 worms. It is believed that a freak weather event lifted the worms along with water from a nearby river. The story was first reported on April first, but there is of yet no indication that it was an April Fool.

The Honeymoon from Hell

Stefan and Erika Svanstrom of Stockholm, Sweden set out on a world tour for their honeymoon. They were stranded in a heavy snowstorm in Munich, Germany in December. They arrived in Cairns, Australia just in time for a cyclone. The couple traveled to Brisbane to find flooding, so left for Perth where there were raging brushfires. The Svanstroms then went to Christchurch, New Zealand, arriving just after the big earthquake in February. They went to a few other locations before traveling to Tokyo, Japan days before the earthquake and tsunami. A calm visit to China wrapped up their trip and they returned to Stockholm on March 29th. The good news is that their marriage survived the trip.

Training Sharks to Eat

Lionfish are pretty, but they belong in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. They lack natural predators in the Caribbean, so lionfish have become quite the invasive species since they escaped from aquariums ten years ago to breed in the waters off the US and Central America. In Honduras, divers are not only hunting them, they are also training sharks to eat the lionfish! Humans are also encouraged to eat lionfish, which are tasty once the venomous spines are removed.

Elderly Woman Cuts off Internet in Two Countries

An unnamed 75-year-old woman in Ksani, Georgia was looking for scrap metal and dug up a cable, which she cut in order to sell it. The cable was a fiber optic line that carried internet service to users in Georgia and neighboring Armenia. Thousands of subscribers in both countries were offline for several hours, with up to 90 percent of users in Armenia affected. The woman was arrested for damaging property, and could face up to three years in jail. Due to her age, she was released pending trial.

Man Glued to Walmart Toilet Seat

An April Fool's Day prank left a man stuck to a toilet seat at the Walmart store in Elkton, Maryland. Lt. Matthew Donnelly of the Elkton Police Department said someone put glue on a toilet seat in the store's mens room.

There, they found the 48-year-old victim, who called for help after realizing the sticky situation he was in when he tried -- and failed -- to stand up and leave the superstore's restroom, Donnelly said.

It took responders 15 minutes to remove the victim from the stall, but they were unable to disconnect the toilet seat from his body, Donnelly said.

Instead, the victim was taken to Union Hospital of Cecil County, where the seat was detached. He left with only minor injuries to his buttocks, Donnelly said.

The perpetrator, if found, could face second-degree assault charges.

Woman Fights to Keep her Disabled Kangaroo

Christie Carr of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma is seeking an exemption from the city council from the regulation against keeping exotic animals. Carr cares for a paralyzed red kangaroo named Irwin. Carr, who suffers from depression, knew Irwin even before the animal's run-in with a fence that left him disabled. Now he is her certified therapy animal, and Carr takes him everywhere, including visits to a nursing home where the residents enjoy cuddling with a kangaroo. Because of his paralysis, Irwin is not likely to grow to full size or become dangerous, but city council members are leery of setting a precedent with an exemption.

Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream
arrow
Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

Original image
iStock
arrow
travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
Original image
iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios