The Quick 10: 10 of the Most Expensive Desserts Ever

For me, there's nothing better than warm chocolate chip cookies out of the oven to satisfy a sweet tooth. If your tastes run a little more expensive, don't worry - there's something for you, too.

1. Golden Opulence Sundae. Long touted as the most expensive sundae in the world, this sweet treat from Serendipity 3 in New York will set you back $1,000. Instead of toppings like sprinkles (jimmies, to some of you) and cherries, Serendipity serves up candied fruits, gold-covered almonds, chocolate truffles, Grande Passion caviar, a gilded sugar flower and syrup made from one of the world's most expensive chocolates.
You also get to keep the Baccarat crystal goblet the Tahitian vanilla bean ice cream is served in.

2. Sometimes, though, a $1,000 sundae just seems a little too plebeian, doesn't it? On days when you really want to blow a your salary on some sweet, check out the $3333.33 banana split offered by Three Twins in Napa. It comes drenched in syrups made from rare dessert wines, and if you give the shop advance notice that you're going to purchase it, they'll hire a cellist to play while you nosh. Three Twins donates $1111.11 of every banana split purchase to a local land trust.

3. That's not even the most expensive offering from Three Twins. They also offer a $60,000 ice cream sundae ($85,000 for two) made from glacial ice from Mount Kilimanjaro. Oh, yeah - purchase price also includes first class airfare to Tanzania, five-star accommodations, a guided climb, all the ice cream you can eat and an organic T-shirt. "Five figures" of your purchase goes directly to an African environmental non-profit.

4. If you have a cool grand burning a hole in your pocket, but ice cream isn't really your thing (what?!), never fear: the Sultan's Golden Cake can satisfy your urges. It's a dish at the Ciragan Palace, a five-star hotel in Istanbul, and it takes 72 hours to make. It includes figs, quince, apricot and pears that have been enjoying a two-year dip in Jamaican Rum. It's then topped with caramel, black truffles and a gold leaf.

5. Serendipity 3 offers another luxury dessert called the "Frrozen Haute Chocolate," a blend of 28 cocoas, including 14 of the most expensive powders from around the world. It also includes five grams of edible 23-karat gold, but the kicker is probably the 18-karat gold bracelet with a carat of diamonds that decorates the base of the goblet. You don't eat that part, of course. Another non-edible is the golden spoon studded with white and chocolate-colored diamonds, and yep, you get to take that home.

6. More for the chocolate lovers - Chocopologie is a store that sells what we think is the most expensive chocolate truffle in the world. It's $5,000 a kilogram, but you can buy a single truffle for just $250. They're located in Norwalk, Connecticut.

7. The Fortress Stilt Fisherman Indulgence dessert at the Fortress Sri Lanka hotel sounds amazing - it's gold leaf cassata containing mango and pomegranate with a fisherman sculpted out of chocolate on the side. But something tells me most of the $14,500 purchase price is going toward the 80-carat aquamarine stone the chocolate fisherman is holding.

8. Likewise, I'm sure the bulk of the $130,000 price of the Platinum Cake designed by a Japanese pastry chef is due to the fact that the multi-tiered confection is adorned with platinum jewelry, including necklaces, brooches, pendants and hair pins. I feel like draping a dessert with jewelry and calling it "The world's most expensive cake" or whatever is sort of cheating. What's to stop someone from plopping the Hope Diamond down on top of a bowl of Jell-O and declaring it "The world's most expensive gelatin snack endorsed by Bill Cosby"?

9. Along that same line of thinking is the ROX cupcake, a $150,000 bite-sized cake created for the "Glam in the City" consumer show in Glasgow last year. It's an average cupcake, but it's sprinkled with diamonds.

10. A lesser cupcake indulgence is the Decadence D'Or from Las Vegas' Sweet Surrender. It doesn't pull the cheap "regular cupcake sprinkled with priceless jewels" trick. First of all, the cake is topped with Louis XIII de Remy Martin Cognac, a 100-year-old vintage. The chocolate is made from the rare Porcelain Crillo bean, and then there's the Tahitan Gold Vanilla Caviar, believed to be the most labor-intensive agricultural crop in the world. And, OK, there are gold flakes.

Would you buy any of these if you had the cash? I might actually go for the $60,000 ice cream if money were no object. I mean, you get an awesome trip out of the deal and a good chunk of your spend goes to charity. That's not so bad.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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