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Make Your Own Easter Basket Treats!

It's very easy to pick up traditional Easter candies at your local store, but it's so much more fun to make them from scratch! Any of these projects can be an enjoyable and educational experience for kids, and homemade treats are a perfectly personal gift. And they're tasty, too.

1. Peeps

Yes, you can make your own marshmallow Peeps. It's just a matter of decorating your homemade marshmallows. Kathleen at Twig & Thistle takes it from there. Add your color before the marshmallow sets. Cut them out with cookie cutters, dampen slightly, and roll in colored sugar. Don't forget little candies for the eyes! An alternate method from Serious Eats uses a whipped marshmallow mixture that you can squeeze into the classic Peep chick shape. It takes a steady hand and a little practice.

2. Cadbury Creme Eggs

Cadbury eggs seem complicated, with a yolk and white that looks like a chicken egg but tastes like heaven. However, this recipe from Instructables breaks it down into steps that you can accomplish. The yellow and white filling are the same thick fondant you can mold with your hands. The chocolate covering is the delicate part, and even if the result is less-than-picturesque, it will taste delicious.

3. Giant Cadbury Creme Egg

Once you've conquered the Cadbury Creme Egg, you may as well make the leap to the giant Cadbury egg. The process requires more ingredients and a bigger mold, but the rewards will be greater as well. The guys who made this 8-inch tall egg also made their own foil wrapper!

4. Chocolate Bunny

Making a chocolate rabbit is just a matter of following instructions for melting chocolate and using a bunny mold. You can make your bunny solid, or let the chocolate cool enough to be a little stiff, then paint the inside of the mold with a even layer to make a hollow bunny, like the chefs in the video. Chocolate Easter eggs are made the same way.

5. Whoppers

Many chocolate Easter eggs are made of malted milk balls, or what we know by the name brand of Whoppers. The simple part of making them at home is mixing chocolate with malted milk powder and rolling into balls. Dipping them in chocolate afterward is kind of tricky, but it's a skill worth practicing. The reviews of the recipe say these are better than Whoppers.

6. Tootsie Rolls

Traditional Tootsie Rolls are relatively inexpensive and plentiful, so you won't save any money by making your own. But the homemade versions are tasty and softer than the store-bought kind. Allrecipes has an extremely easy version, (pictured) with a list of ingredients and simple instructions: "Mix all ingredients together. Knead like you would for bread. Roll into rope shapes and cut into desired lengths." Right, no cooking at all! A slightly more complex recipe that does involve a bit of cooking yields rolls very close in texture to the original.

7. Pop Rocks

I really wanted to find a recipe for homemade jelly beans to complete the traditional Easter basket, but found nothing that really approximated the jelly beans we know and love. However, we can substitute Pop Rocks, because we have a recipe! These directions at Instructables yield a candy that relies on citric acid and baking soda to create the fizzy sensation on your tongue. And don't forget your hammer!

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How Do You Stress the Word: THANKSgiving or ThanksGIVing?
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Here’s something else to stress about for Thanksgiving: where to put the stress in the word Thanksgiving.

If you’re from California, Iowa, or Delaware, you probably say ThanksGIVing, with the primary stress on the second syllable. If you’re from Georgia, Tennessee, or the Texas Panhandle, you probably say THANKSgiving, with the primary stress on the first syllable.

This north-south divide on syllable stress is found for other words like umbrella, guitar, insurance, and pecan. However, those words are borrowed from other languages (Italian, Spanish, French). Sometimes, in the borrowing process, competing stress patterns settle into regional differences. Just as some borrowed words get first syllable stress in the South and second syllable stress in the North, French words like garage and ballet get first syllable stress in the UK and second syllable stress in the U.S.

Thanksgiving, however, is an English word through and through. And if it behaved like a normal English word, it would have stress on the first syllable. Consider other words with the same noun-gerund structure just like it: SEAfaring, BAbysitting, HANDwriting, BULLfighting, BIRDwatching, HOMEcoming, ALMSgiving. The stress is always up front, on the noun. Why, in Thanksgiving alone, would stress shift to the GIVE?

The shift to the ThanksGIVing pronunciation is a bit of a mystery. Linguist John McWhorter has suggested that the loss of the stress on thanks has to do with a change in our concept of the holiday, that we “don’t truly think about Thanksgiving as being about thankfulness anymore.” This kind of thing can happen when a word takes on a new, more abstract sense. When we use outgoing for mail that is literally going out, we are likely to stress the OUT. When we use it as a description of someone’s personality ("She's so outgoing!"), the stress might show up on the GO. Stress can shift with meaning.

But the stress shift might not be solely connected to the entrenchment of our turkey-eating rituals. The thanksGIVing stress pattern seems to have pre-dated the institution of the American holiday, according to an analysis of the meter of English poems by Mark Liberman at Language Log. ThanksGIVing has been around at least since the 17th century. However you say it, there is precedent to back you up. And room enough to focus on both the thanks and the giving.

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Watch Boris Karloff's 1966 Coffee Commercial
TAKWest, Youtube
TAKWest, Youtube

Horror legend Boris Karloff is famous for playing mummies, mad scientists, and of course, Frankenstein’s creation. In 1930, Karloff cemented the modern image of the monster—with its rectangular forehead, bolted neck, and enormous boots (allegedly weighing in at 11 pounds each)—in the minds of audiences.

But the horror icon, who was born 130 years ago today, also had a sense of humor. The actor appeared in numerous comedies, and even famously played a Boris Karloff look-alike (who’s offended when he’s mistaken for Karloff) in the original Broadway production of Arsenic and Old Lace

In the ’60s, Karloff also put his comedic chops to work in a commercial for Butter-Nut Coffee. The strange commercial, set in a spooky mansion, plays out like a movie scene, in which Karloff and the viewer are co-stars. Subtitles on the bottom of the screen feed the viewer lines, and Karloff responds accordingly. 

Watch the commercial below to see the British star selling coffee—and read your lines aloud to feel like you’re “acting” alongside Karloff. 

[h/t: Retroist]

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