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The Number of the Day: 1,200

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In 2001, famed chef and television host Julia Child donated her entire kitchen to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The kitchen, which played host to three of Child’s television programs, contained more than 1,200 items, which were inventoried, packed into containers and shipped to the Smithsonian for reassembly.


Related Fact: Child’s famous book Mastering the Art of French Cooking was first published in 1961 – but didn’t make its way onto the New York Times Best Seller List until 48 years later. When it finally did appear there in 2009, much of the boost in sales for the 700-plus page tome was attributed to its role in the film Julie & Julia.

[Sources: Smithsonian and NY Times. See previous Numbers of the Day here.]

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This Puzzling Math Brain Teaser Has a Simple Solution
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Fans of number-based brainteasers might find themselves pleasantly stumped by the following question, posed by TED-Ed’s Alex Gendler: Which sequence of integers comes next?

1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, ?

Mathematicians may recognize this pattern as a specific type of number sequence—called a “look-and-say sequence"—that yields a distinct pattern. As for those who aren't number enthusiasts, they should try reading the numbers they see aloud (so that 1 becomes "one one," 11 is "two ones," 21 is "one two, one one,” and so on) to figure the answer.

Still can’t crack the code? Learn the surprisingly simple secret to solving the sequence by watching the video below.

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What Number Is The Answer?
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