To Paywall or Not to Paywall?

So the New York Times just announced that pretty soon they'll be instituting a sort-of-complicated paywall system for their website content, which will be free if you view twenty or fewer articles per month, and $15/month for "heavy users." Readers who are referred to specific articles via Twitter or certain other social media sites will be able to see them regardless of how many articles they've viewed. All of which makes me go, aww, really? For a few years now my morning routine has been, almost without fail:

1) make espresso
2) blog for mentalfloss.com while caffeinating
3) eat breakfast while reading NYTimes.com on my laptop

To have to pay $180/year for #3 seems excessive, especially considering that an actual honest-to-god paper subscription costs just $120 more. Honestly, at this point I'm so used to reading everything on my laptop that I'm not sure I'd want to deal with paper, which requires lots of folding and unfolding whilst article-skimming and simultaneously pushing eggs and toast around my plate with a fork and knife, and if I'm eating anything with my hands (bagels, toast, orange wedges, etc) then the newspaper ink that inevitably rubs off on my fingers probably wends its way onto my food and, well ... let's just say that when you've gone digital, there's no going back.

So I'm not subbing to the paper version. And just switching to reading the LA Times or CNN online won't do, since they're ... well ... not as good. So I'm not entirely certain what to do, aside from parting with $180/year of my hard-earned filthy lucre. (Though I would consider paying maybe half that just to get rid of all the accursed ads.) The always-astute Cory Doctorow has written eight reasons why the paywall won't work, in which he makes several good points, including A) that there needs to be a way to pay for quality investigative journalism in our Brave New World and B) that this may not be the best way to do it.

So I'm at a loss, and I'd love to know what you all think.

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN

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