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The Weird Week in Review

Intruder calls 911 Out of Fear

Timothy James Chapek was taking a shower in Portland, Oregon, when someone came into the house. Afraid that the person might have a gun, Chapek locked himself in the bathroom and dialed 911. So did the homeowner, who had been surprised to arrive and find the stranger in the shower. Chapek told emergency services that he had broken into the house, and was afraid the homeowner might shoot him. Police arrested Chapek without incident and charged him with criminal trespass.

Colorful Spill

A truck full of commercial ink crashed on an I-95 ramp in the Boston area Wednesday, spilling the colored ink all over the highway. No one was injured in the wreck.

Several hundred gallons of ink splattered onto the highway, said Joe Ferson, a spokesman for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection.

Approximately 16,000 pounds of ink cartridges from the Flint Group, an Indianapolis-based company selling printing and packaging products, was bound for a newspaper company in Portland, Maine. Red, blue, and yellow ink cartridges were inside the truck, but Ferson said there is no evidence the yellow ink was released.

Although the spilled ink is not considered hazardous, the ramp was closed for hours for cleanup. The video clearly shows the presence of yellow ink.

Bigfoot Sues New Hampshire

Jonathan Doyle dressed in a Bigfoot costume and wandered about on Mount Monadnock in 2009. He filmed his antics and the reactions of those who spotted him. He tried to recreate the stunt in 2010 for another film, but park rangers told him he couldn't do that without a permit and insurance. Now Doyle has filed suit against the state of New Hampshire, saying the park staff infringed on his right of free speech and expression. The American Civil Liberties Union is siding with Doyle.

Haircut Interrupted by Stabbing

David Davis of New Haven, Connecticut was in the process of getting his hair cut at a salon when a man approached him in an "aggressive manner." Davis grabbed a pair of barber's scissors and stabbed the man. Police did not know how severely the victim was wounded, but said there was a lot of blood on his clothing. He was taken to Stamford Hospital. Police apprehended 21-year-old Davis shortly afterward, who said the stabbing was in defense. Davis' mugshot is evidence that the new hairstyle was only half completed when the incident occurred.

Thieves Break into Prison

A prison break usually involves someone wanting to get out, but someone actually broke into New Plymouth Prison in New Zealand last Friday night. Firefighters responded to a report of fire in the prison administration building and found the curtains ablaze. Police were called because the window was found to have been forced open. A 50" plasma screen TV set was missing. Despite the presence of closed circuit video feeds, electronic security measures, and barbed wires, someone got away with a rather large television.

Woman Keeps Pet Crocodiles

Vicki Lowing lives in Australia with her three pet crocodiles. She adopted Johnie, her first crocodile, fifteen years ago. Johnie is now 6 feet long! Lowing tells how the crocodile would get into bed with her and her then-husband, and even sleep with her young son.

"Johnie would jump on Andrew's bed nearly every night. They were like a brother and sister," Lowing said.

Animal experts tell 20/20 there is no way to domesticate a crocodile. They are too aggressive, powerful and unpredictable. Ultimately a relationship like this may end in real tears – and not crocodile ones.

Lowing is one of several people who keep crocodiles as pets.

Man Suspected of Child-seat Violation

Police in Australia pulled over a car for a random drunk-driving check, and wanted to know why 19-year-old Khagendra Thapa Magar was not properly restrained in a child safety seat. Magar holds the current world record as the smallest man. He is only 67 centimeters tall (2' 2") and weighs only 5kg (12lbs). Magar, a resident of Nepal, was in Australia on a charity tour to raise awareness of global sex trafficking. Police let Magar and his entourage continue traveling after seeing his passpor

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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iStock
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travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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