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Morning Cup of Links: Egg Toss

Ten percent of all people are left-handed, a ratio that holds up over generations. While we can correlate a lot of things with handedness, we still don’t know what causes it.
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Which Star Trek series do you like the best? It doesn’t really matter, because you can watch them all here, at least for now. (via Metafilter)
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Use a steady hand and a virtual catapult to toss Cadbury Creme Eggs at any Google Maps location. I managed to “egg” my own home! (via the Presurfer)
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What Pi Sounds Like. Numerical data transposed into music, rendered on different musical instruments, makes a nice tune.
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Did you read the story about how scientists found bacteria inside a meteorite? Too bad the facts aren’t there. It’s not the first time this has happened, either.
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The History of Science Fiction, laid out on a large timeline. This artwork by Ward Shelley enlarges to a size that might take you all day to follow. (via Neatorama)
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A scientist with lots of hair explains Schrodinger’s Cat and its quantum state. No cats were killed in the making of this thought experiment.
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6 Television Firsts (from Canned Laughter to Dropping the “D” Word). My first thought was that the “d-word was “divorce” but I was wrong.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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