Morning Cup of Links: The Oscar Hangover

Anything that’s not worth staying up all night for will be on the ‘net the next day anyway. See the complete list of Oscar winners, plus photos and videos at the Academy Awards site.
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People who were conceived through anonymous sperm donation are demanding the right to know who their fathers are. How does this understandable desire balance against the donor’s right to privacy?
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Lessons in Manliness from the Egyptian Revolution. A participant writes about how the experience changed him for the better.
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Zach Anner Gets His TV Show. No quest is too underwater or fictional for the comedian and travel expert-in-training.
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Single White Feline explains how crazy cat ladies are born. A cat is not always your best friend.
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Photographer Howard Schatz gave actors several roles and scenarios to inhabit as he took their pictures. The results were combined for a portrait gallery featuring the masters of emotions.
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The Marmoset Song. Go watch this while I run, run far away!
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8 Rejected Supreme Court Justices. Thirty-four nominations were not confirmed by the senate, and some have rather interesting reasons.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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