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The Quick 10: Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, the fastest ride in the wilderness

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With the addition of Splash Mountain and recent revamp of Space Mountain at the Magic Kingdom, not to mention other parks’ thrill rides like Tower of Terror and Expedition Everest, I think Big Thunder Mountain Railroad is often overlooked. It’s a speedy little coaster ride, but it’s not going to drop you from dizzying heights or spiral you in a series of upside down loops. I think that’s part of its charm. Hope you enjoy part three of your vicarious Disney vacation – come back tomorrow to learn a bit about the classic Dumbo ride.


Photo from
Chimaira 500, Wikimedia Commons.

2. All of the mountains and rock formations on the ride are based on specific structures that already exist in nature. For instance, Disneyland’s rock spires were inspired by the hoodoos of Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park; the Magic Kingdom, Tokyo and Paris rides all feature buttes found in Monument Valley.

3. This roller coaster was the first Disney ride to use computer design for the track, and there were apparently a lot of challenges doing it. Said designer Tony Baxter:

There is a spiral on Big Thunder, near the beginning of the ride, where it goes around and then heads back. The computer kept moving it over, because it did not want that much track there. It wanted to shorten the length of track. And I wanted it over there because it looked good as a design. I like the composition of the three summits, the pyramid composition of shapes. The computer kept moving the track which made the ride somewhat less attractive. So 9 times I did a new design that I thought would solve the problem and the computer would say no. So we built 9 tiny models to check the look until the computer said, “OK, I will accept this. This one is OK.” That was the one we ended up building. But it took 9 designs before the computer approved !

4. The punny names of the runaway trains (cue Soul Asylum) include U.B. Bold, U.R. Daring, U.R. Courageous, I.M. Brave, I.B. Hearty and I.M. Fearless.

5. If you’ve ever looked at some of the props scattered throughout the queue and the ride and wondered how Disney did such a great job creating them, the answer is… they didn’t. Actual antique mining equipment was purchased for the rides at auctions and stores throughout the Southwest. Things that were actually used include a double-stamp ore crusher, a hauling wagon and a mill that extracted the gold from the ore.

6. About 20 animatronics are scattered throughout the ride, including a rainmaker named Professor Cumulus Isobar.

7. When Disneyland first opened, the ride where Big Thunder Mountain is now was a somewhat similar (but much tamer) attraction called “Rainbow Caverns Mine Train.” This was replaced by the “Mine Train Through Nature’s Wonderland” in 1960, which was a lot like the Jungle Cruise set in the American Southwest. If you check out the pictures over at Yesterland (where the photo is from), you’ll see that many of the elements of the Mine Train rides were recycled for the more-thrilling roller coaster that debuted in 1979.

8. In fact, the name “Big Thunder Mountain” itself pays tribute to the rides that came before it. “Big Thunder” was the name of a waterfall riders passed on the Main Train rides; “Little Thunder” was just a stone’s throw away.

9. Though it’s certainly not the fastest or craziest ride in the parks, Big Thunder has claimed a life. In 2003, a man riding the coaster at Disneyland was killed when a train derailed, causing the locomotive piece to jump up off the track, hit the ceiling of a tunnel and come back down on the first car. Ten other riders were also injured.

10. The voice of the prospector who narrates the ride belongs to Dallas McKennon. It’s possible that you’ve heard him in any number of Disney projects: as Ben Franklin at the American Adventure in Epcot, as the Owl in Sleeping Beauty, as the fox in Mary Poppins, or as a whole cast of minor characters in both Lady and the Tramp and 101 Dalmatians. Non-Disney projects included the “voice” of Max in How the Grinch Stole Christmas and Archie Andrews in the Archie animated series of the ‘60s.

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How Do You Stress the Word: THANKSgiving or ThanksGIVing?
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iStock

Here’s something else to stress about for Thanksgiving: where to put the stress in the word Thanksgiving.

If you’re from California, Iowa, or Delaware, you probably say ThanksGIVing, with the primary stress on the second syllable. If you’re from Georgia, Tennessee, or the Texas Panhandle, you probably say THANKSgiving, with the primary stress on the first syllable.

This north-south divide on syllable stress is found for other words like umbrella, guitar, insurance, and pecan. However, those words are borrowed from other languages (Italian, Spanish, French). Sometimes, in the borrowing process, competing stress patterns settle into regional differences. Just as some borrowed words get first syllable stress in the South and second syllable stress in the North, French words like garage and ballet get first syllable stress in the UK and second syllable stress in the U.S.

Thanksgiving, however, is an English word through and through. And if it behaved like a normal English word, it would have stress on the first syllable. Consider other words with the same noun-gerund structure just like it: SEAfaring, BAbysitting, HANDwriting, BULLfighting, BIRDwatching, HOMEcoming, ALMSgiving. The stress is always up front, on the noun. Why, in Thanksgiving alone, would stress shift to the GIVE?

The shift to the ThanksGIVing pronunciation is a bit of a mystery. Linguist John McWhorter has suggested that the loss of the stress on thanks has to do with a change in our concept of the holiday, that we “don’t truly think about Thanksgiving as being about thankfulness anymore.” This kind of thing can happen when a word takes on a new, more abstract sense. When we use outgoing for mail that is literally going out, we are likely to stress the OUT. When we use it as a description of someone’s personality ("She's so outgoing!"), the stress might show up on the GO. Stress can shift with meaning.

But the stress shift might not be solely connected to the entrenchment of our turkey-eating rituals. The thanksGIVing stress pattern seems to have pre-dated the institution of the American holiday, according to an analysis of the meter of English poems by Mark Liberman at Language Log. ThanksGIVing has been around at least since the 17th century. However you say it, there is precedent to back you up. And room enough to focus on both the thanks and the giving.

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Watch Boris Karloff's 1966 Coffee Commercial
TAKWest, Youtube
TAKWest, Youtube

Horror legend Boris Karloff is famous for playing mummies, mad scientists, and of course, Frankenstein’s creation. In 1930, Karloff cemented the modern image of the monster—with its rectangular forehead, bolted neck, and enormous boots (allegedly weighing in at 11 pounds each)—in the minds of audiences.

But the horror icon, who was born 130 years ago today, also had a sense of humor. The actor appeared in numerous comedies, and even famously played a Boris Karloff look-alike (who’s offended when he’s mistaken for Karloff) in the original Broadway production of Arsenic and Old Lace

In the ’60s, Karloff also put his comedic chops to work in a commercial for Butter-Nut Coffee. The strange commercial, set in a spooky mansion, plays out like a movie scene, in which Karloff and the viewer are co-stars. Subtitles on the bottom of the screen feed the viewer lines, and Karloff responds accordingly. 

Watch the commercial below to see the British star selling coffee—and read your lines aloud to feel like you’re “acting” alongside Karloff. 

[h/t: Retroist]

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