CLOSE

Morning Cup of Links: the Real Lois Lane

What’s the difference between animals we can domesticate and animals we can’t? It’s in the genes, and it turns out that when we selectively breed friendly animals, we also get cute and smart animals.
*
The Soviets always wanted to build ever bigger, better, and more modern buildings. Some of those projects look downright freakish to 21st century eyes. (via Metafilter)
*
Watch a 3D video mapping experiment called Living Room. A white room and furniture is assigned different colors and textures and sent through quick changes.
*
“Let me show you why you would not want to be shot by a .357 Magnum.” Not that I ever did, but this guy drove the point home convincingly. NSFW language.
*
Joanne Siegel was the real-life inspiration behind the character of Lois Lane. She auditioned for a modeling job as a teenager and ended up married to Superman’s co-creator.
*
The Evolution of Ghosts. Weren’t they invented to scare us? What happened?
*
What to Do (and Not Do) In A Fistfight. Asking for a three-step head start toward the door isn’t a bad idea, either.

arrow
History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

nextArticle.image_alt|e
arrow
video
A Tour of the New York Academy of Medicine's Rare Book Room
5681952264001

The Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine documents the evolution of our medical knowledge. Its books and artifacts are as bizarre as they are fascinating. Read more here.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios