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5 Interesting Study Abroad Destinations

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Study abroad has become a staple of the college experience, with England, Italy, Spain, France and Australia being some of the most popular destinations for U.S. students. But what if you want to study off the beaten path? Pick one of these cities, and you're sure to get a less-than-typical study abroad experience.

1. McMurdo Station, Antarctica

Although there are currently no study abroad programs in space, Antarctica's programs come pretty close. Biology students can stay at the McMurdo Station, a U.S. run station on Ross Island. Topics of study include global warming and climate. If you choose to go, remember this one fact about one of the world's most remote regions: in Antarctica, no one can hear you scream.

2. Bamako, Mali


If helping a country with some of the lowest health and development indicators and one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world sounds like your kind of thing, then you might be interested in Mali. SIT Study Abroad offers a "Health, Gender, and Community Empowerment" program that delivers students to the capital city, Bamako. You might want to brush up on your Bambara before you go, though French is the country's official language. [Image via Wikimedia Commons user Guaka]

3. Irkutsk, Russia

When I was little, I played a lot of Risk. In addition to learning about military strategy, I learned where Irkutsk is. It's in Russia. Siberia, to be exact. Siberia as in frozen, hostile, let's-send-prisoners-of-war-there Siberia. If you're interested in Siberian tigers, vodka, and Russians, Irkutsk might be the place for you. More officially, study abroad programs in Irkutsk specialize in Russian history and industrialization. Be sure to pick up one of those furry hats, though, as winter temperatures are regularly in the negatives.

4. Saint-Louis, Senegal

You could go to France to learn French. Or you could go to Senegal. Although no one really knows where the name Senegal comes from, the country isn't too hard to find. Located on the Western end of Africa, Senegal is known for its distinct musical heritage. Although Australia is a much more popular destination, Senegal is similarly focused on enjoying the moment and forgetting life's worries. Essentially, then, Senegal is like a French African Australia with fewer kangaroos where the cultural instrument is the tama instead of the didgeridoo.

5. Malé, The Maldives

In addition to having the coolest flag in the world, the Maldives is also the lowest country in the world. Since the '70s, the invention of the picture-a-day calendar showcasing the country has caused a substantial increase in tourism (well, that and the country's push for tourism). In 1972, there were two resorts on the 26 atolls that make up the country. In 2007, there were 92 resorts. Marine life, crystal clear water, and blue skies make the Maldives popular for both tourists and biology students alike.[Image via Wikimedia Commons user Shahee Ilyas]
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Did you study abroad? If you could go back and design your own program, where would you go, and what would you study?

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Adult-Sized Little Tikes-Inspired Car Spotted in UK
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eBay

Remember scooting around town in your red and yellow Little Tikes toy car? The fun plastic vehicle offered accessible mobility like a tricycle, but with the sophistication of a real car. It was never meant to be driven outside of the cul-de-sac, but what if there was a grown-up version that could be taken out on the road?

Mechanic John Bitmead and his brother Geoff of Attitude Autos created just that back in 2015, with an oversized spin on the classic kid wheels. It's road-legal and fully functional, looking somewhat similar to a Smart Car (but way cooler). The car was adapted from a Daewoo Matiz and took 16 weeks to make. Despite its small size, it can go up to 70 miles per hour.

This nostalgic creation eventually wound up on eBay for bids of at least £21,500 (roughly $33,000). It only had 5000 miles on it. Sadly, it seems the vehicle went unsold. But Bitmead doesn't appear to be finished with his unique customs. His Instagram page features a post-apocalyptic roadster with a bright pink Hello Kitty paint job. If you live in the UK, perhaps one day you'll see the two racing during your morning commute.

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A Private Island In Maine Can Be Yours for $650,000
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Acadia Realty Group

With its blue waters, bountiful seafood, and pristine pebbled beaches, there’s a reason Maine is nicknamed “Vacationland.” Now, Boston Magazine reports that urbanites wanting to flee the urban jungle for pine tree forests can purchase their own private island in Brooklin, Maine—complete with cottage and lighthouse—for $650,000.

Green Island is a one-acre plot of land with views of Acadia National Park’s mountains and the tiny island of Isle Au Haut. Its two-story, four-bedroom cottage comes equipped with a half bathroom, solar electricity, a wood-burning stove, a full kitchen, and an expansive porch. As for the lighthouse, the tower—known as the Blue Hill Bay Lighthouse—was constructed in the 1850s, and discontinued in 1933.

Green Island is presumably accessible by boat, but realtors say that inhabitants can also walk to the mainland during low tide. Interested in purchasing your own piece of Vacationland? Check out some photos below, or view the listing here.

Green Island, in Brooklin, Maine
Acadia Realty Group

Green Island, in Brooklin, Maine
Acadia Realty Group

Green Island, in Brooklin, Maine
Acadia Realty Group

Green Island, in Brooklin, Maine
Acadia Realty Group

Green Island, in Brooklin, Maine
Acadia Realty Group

[h/t Boston Magazine]

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