CLOSE

Our Readers' Favorite Bookstore Cats (Volume One)

One of the ways independent book stores distinguish themselves from the big chain stores is to make their shop into a literary home, where people like to hang out. Having a cat (or many cats) around is a simple way to do that -and it keeps the mice away! When 12 Bookstore Cats was posted last week, we received responses from dozens of bookstore cat fans, and tips on lots of cats to meet.

1. Sir Marjorie Lambshank III

The Park Slope Community Bookstore in Brooklyn has an entire menagerie of pets, although you'd never know it from looking through their website (however, the website is full of neat stuff, like their delivery offer). The store cat is named Sir Marjorie Lambshank III, and he (yes, he) has his own (one-post) blog. And Twitter feed. Sir Marjorie explains that the name "Marjorie" was given to mellow him out, and "Sir" was added to make it clear that Marjorie is a male.

2. Trini and 3. Ida B.

Wild Rumpus Books in Minneapolis has a variety of critters, including chickens, rodents, reptiles, and several Manx cats. The two pictured are Trini and Ida B. You'll see more of the children's book store's pets on their Facebook page.

4. Hodge

Selected Works Used Books & Sheet Music in Chicago employs Hodge to meet and greet book lovers. A customer talks about Hodge in this review:

...a gorgeous, soft-furred, grey mischief-maker who will claw at your leg when you sit down and sprawl in the middle of the floor right behind where you stand. But I'm already fond of the little devil, and s/he lends a lot of character to the place, so it's okay.

The store's Facebook page has an album of Hodge's photographs.

5. Fred

Columbia Books in Columbia, Missouri opened during the time I lived in the town, but that was long before Fred was born. Fred is a large, fluffy cat who likes to sprawl on the windowsills of the bookstore.

6. Won Ton

Won Ton is the mascot at Chop Suey Books in Richmond, Virginia. What little we know about Won Ton is from a collaborative poem written about him. He likes attention: of course, he's a cat! See lots more pictures at the store's Facebook page.

7. Franny

Skylight Books in Los Angeles has a web page devoted to their store mascot Franny. Franny is a young cat, having arrived at the bookstore as a three-month-old kitten in 2009. They also maintain a memorial page for the beloved previous cat, Lucy, who lived at the store nearly ten years until she died in 2007.

8. Felixia and 9. Bartleby Lucas

Adams Avenue Book Store is in San Diego. Information about the store's cats is relegated to the store's Facebook page, where I found pictures of Felixia and Bartleby Lucas. Bartleby Lucas (the lower cat shown) has his own Facebook page, where he lists his relationship status as "it's complicated".

10. Isbn and 11. Bob

Recycle Books in Campbell, California once had a cat named Isbn, who was given the "Best Bookstore Cat Name" by Publisher's Weekly. A customer informs us that Isbn (left) retired to live in a private home and the new store cat (right) is named Bob.

12. Hobo

From My Shelf Books in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania has a friendly cat named Hobo. Hobo has his hand, or paw, in everything: he writes a weekly book column for the local paper, he posed for the store's sign designed in his likeness, and he co-wrote a children's book with store owner Kevin Coolidge, called Hobo Finds a Home. It's an autobiography. Hobo also cuddles with customers every day.

13. and beyond: Chapel Hill Cats

Eric Johnson, who owns Recycle Books is also the proprietor of The Bookshop in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The store has several cats on the premises, including this orange tabby in the window. Customers love the cats but leave no record of their names. Image by Flickr user bunchofpants.

If your favorite bookstore cat isn't listed here, it may be found in one of the previous posts, 12 Bookstore Cats and 8 Bookstore Cats. Or it may be in the next edition of the Bookstore Cat series!

See also: 8 Library Cats

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Arend Kuester, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
arrow
architecture
Qatar National Library's Panorama-Style Bookshelves Offer Guests Stunning Views
Arend Kuester, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Arend Kuester, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The newly opened Qatar National Library in the capital city of Doha contains more than 1 million books, some of which date back to the 15th century. Co.Design reports that the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) designed the building so that the texts under its roof are the star attraction.

When guests walk into the library, they're given an eyeful of its collections. The shelves are arranged stadium-style, making it easy to appreciate the sheer number of volumes in the institution's inventory from any spot in the room. Not only is the design photogenic, it's also practical: The shelves, which were built from the same white marble as the floors, are integrated into the building's infrastructure, providing artificial lighting, ventilation, and a book-return system to visitors. The multi-leveled arrangement also gives guests more space to read, browse, and socialize.

"With Qatar National Library, we wanted to express the vitality of the book by creating a design that brings study, research, collaboration, and interaction within the collection itself," OMA writes on its website. "The library is conceived as a single room which houses both people and books."

While most books are on full display, OMA chose a different route for the institution's Heritage Library, which contains many rare, centuries-old texts on Arab-Islamic history. This collection is housed in a sunken space 20 feet below ground level, with beige stone features that stand out from the white marble used elsewhere. Guests need to use a separate entrance to access it, but they can look down at the collection from the ground floor above.

If Qatar is too far of a trip, there are plenty of libraries in the U.S. that are worth a visit. Check out these panoramas of the most stunning examples.

Qatar library.

Qatar library.

Qatar library.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images: Arend Kuester, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
Reading Aloud to Your Kids Can Promote Good Behavior and Sharpen Their Attention
iStock
iStock

Some benefits of reading aloud to children are easy to see. It allows parents to introduce kids to books that they're not quite ready to read on their own, thus improving their literacy skills. But a new study published in the journal Pediatrics shows that the simple act of reading to your kids can also influence their behavior in surprising ways.

As The New York Times reports, researchers looked at young children from 675 low-income families. Of that group, 225 families were enrolled in a parent-education program called the Video Interaction Project, or VIP, with the remaining families serving as the control.

Participants in VIP visited a pediatric clinic where they were videotaped playing and reading with their children, ranging in age from infants to toddlers, for about five minutes. Following the sessions, videos were played back for parents so they could see how their kids responded to the positive interactions.

They found that 3-year-olds taking part in the study had a much lower chance of being aggressive or hyperactive than children in the control group of the same age. The researchers wondered if these same effects would still be visible after the program ended, so they revisited the children 18 months later when the kids were approaching grade-school age. Sure enough, the study subjects showed fewer behavioral problems and better focus than their peers who didn't receive the same intervention.

Reading to kids isn't just a way to get them excited about books at a young age—it's also a positive form of social interaction, which is crucial at the early stages of social and emotional development. The study authors write, "Such programs [as VIP] can result in clinically important differences on long-term educational outcomes, given the central role of behavior for child learning."

Being read to is something that can benefit all kids, but for low-income parents working long hours and unable to afford childcare, finding the time for it is often a struggle. According to the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health, only 34 percent of children under 5 in families below the poverty line were read to every day, compared with 60 percent of children from wealthier families. One way to narrow this divide is by teaching new parents about the benefits of reading to their children, possibly when they visit the pediatrician during the crucial first months of their child's life.

[h/t The New York Times]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios