250 Movie Introductions of 185 People, Groups, and Things

Look, it's Friday. You've got nine and a half minutes to kill. Why not watch a supercut of a bunch of 250 people (or cyborgs, or heroes, or villains) introducing 185 people, groups, and things from classic (and very not-classic) movies? It's weirdly hypnotic. I also feel a little weird that I recognize virtually all of these movies. How many movies have I seen, anyway?!

My favorite, from Spaceballs: "I am your father's brother's nephew's cousin's former roommate." Warning: a fair number of swear words sneak their way into this video.

And yeah, Inigo Montoya makes an appearance.

After the jump, a complete list of the movies used, in order. (From YouTube video's author.)

Introductions taken from the following movies (in order):
Rambo III, Batman, Iron Man, Batman Returns, Kick-Ass, Mortal Kombat, The Matrix Revolutions, Star Trek, Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope, Toy Story, Death to Smoochy, Child's Play, Labyrinth, Ghost Rider, Spider-Man, Spartacus, Superbad, Pulp Fiction, Fight Club, Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, Grindhouse: Planet Terror, National Lampoon's Animal House, Spaceballs, Beowulf, X-Men: The Last Stand, The Rocketeer, Die Hard, Back to the Future, The Matrix, Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, Austin Powers in Goldmember, Young Einstein, Misery, Beetlejuice, Army of Darkness, The Departed, Wayne's world 2, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Warriors, Rocky IV, The Devil's Advocate, Ghostbusters, Spawn, The Rock, Tron, Ed Wood, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Hook, Wayne's World, Gross Pointe Blank, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, True Lies, Last Action Hero, Tombstone, Shoot 'Em Up, The Shawshank Redemption, Tropic Thunder, Judge Dredd, Alien: Resurrection, Star Wars: Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, Tomorrow Never Dies, The Santa clause, WALL-E, RoboCop, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Howard the Duck, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie, xXx, First Blood, The Goonies, UHF, The Fifth Element, Edward Scissorhands, Superman: The Movie, Clash of the Titans, Super Mario Bros., Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, The Man Who Knew Too Little, Rocky, The Sandlot, Planet of the Apes, The Princess Bride, Pee Wee's Big Adventure, The Neverending Story, Disney's Hercules; Me, Myself, & Irene; The Pest, Gladiator, Transformers, Monster Squad, The Godfather, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, Sixteen Candles, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Forrest Gump, Goldfinger, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan, Glengary Glen Ross, Raising Arizona, Batman Forever, V For Vendetta, Snatch, G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, Escape From L.A., The Punisher, Machete (Grindhouse trailer), In the Heat of the Night, Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny, Black Dynamite, Little Shop of Horrors, Kung Fu Panda, Ocean's Twelve, The Big Lebowski, Addams Family Values, Almost Famous, Billy Madison, Groundhog Day, Titanic, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Galaxy Quest, The Breakfast Club, Network, ¡Three Amigos!, Mystery Men, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure, The Hangover, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, The Blues Brothers, Men in Black, Sneakers, The Running Man (TV static)

I'm Chris Higgins, and I approved this blog post.

5 Film Transitions Worth Knowing

You see them every day, on TV shows, the news, and in movies, but how well do you know the most oft-used film transitions? Here are the big five:


The dissolve is an editing technique where one clip seems to fade—or dissolve—into the next. As the first clip is fading out, getting lighter and lighter, the second clip starts fading in, becoming more and more prominent. The process usually happens so subtly and so quickly, the viewer isn't even aware of the transition. The above video offers a great overview of the cut, with examples.


This transition is the opposite of the dissolve in that it draws attention to itself. The best example of the wipe is what's known as the Iris Wipe, which you usually find in silent films, like Buster Keaton's or the Merrie Melodies cartoons—the circle getting smaller and smaller. Other wipe shapes include stars, diamonds, and the old turning clock.

The Star Wars films are chock-full of attention-grabbing wipes. Here are two good examples from The Empire Strikes Back. The first shows the clock wipe; the second, the diagonal wipe (pay no attention to the broken blocks at the start of the second clip—that's a technical glitch, not part of the film).


As the name implies, in the basic cutaway, the filmmaker is moving from the action to something else, and then coming back to the action. Cutaways are used to edit out boring shots (like people driving to their destination—why not see what the character is seeing or even thinking sometimes?) or add action to a sequence by changing the pace of the footage. My favorite use of the cutaway is in Family Guy, where the technique is used to insert throwaway gags. Here's a great example:


The L Cut, also called a split edit, is a very cool technique whose name dates back to the old analog film days.

The audio track on a strip of celluloid film runs along the side, near the sprocket holes. In the L Cut transition, the editor traditionally cut the picture frames out of the strip, but left the narrow audio track intact, thus creating an L-shape out of the film. A different camera angle, or scene was then spliced into the spot where the old picture was, so the audio from the old footage was now cut over the new footage.

Of course, with digital editing, one doesn't need to physically cut anything anymore, but the transition is still widely used, and the name has remained the same.

Split edits like these are especially effective in portraying conversations. Imagine how a simple conversation between two people might look if all we ever got was a ping-pong edit back and forth between the two people talking. The L cut allows the viewer to read the emotion on the listener's face, as the dialogue continues over, as we see in this clip from Ferris Bueller's Day Off:


The fade in and fade out usually signal the beginning or end of a scene, especially if the filmmaker is fading to/from black. This is the most common, of course, but fading to white has become trendy, too. The opening title sequence from the HBO series Six Feet Under featured many fades to black and a couple brief fades to white. The very last bit in the sequence fades slowly to white, and is my all-time favorite example of the transition:

science fiction
Why So Many Aliens in Pop Culture Look Familiar

Aliens have been depicted countless times in cinema, from Georges Méliès's A Trip to the Moon (1902) to James Cameron's Avatar (2009). But despite the advancements in special-effects technology over the past century, most aliens we see on screen still share a lot of similarities—mainly, they look, move, and interact with the world like humans do. Vox explains how the classic alien look came to be in their new video below.

When you picture an alien, you may imagine a being with reptilian skin or big, black eyes, but the basic components of a human body—two arms, two legs, and a head with a face—are likely all there. In reality, finding an intelligent creature that evolved all those same features on a planet millions of light-years away would be an extraordinary coincidence. If alien life does exist, it may not look like anything we've ever seen on Earth.

But when it comes to science fiction, accuracy isn't always the goal. Creating an alien character humans can relate to may take priority. Or, the alien's design may need to work as a suit that can be worn by human performers. The result is a version of extraterrestrial life that looks alien— but not too alien—to movie audiences.

So if aliens probably won't have four limbs, two eyes, and a mouth, what would they look like if we ever met them person? These experts have some theories.

[h/t Vox]


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