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Talking Pictures: Times of Trouble

Unemployment, wars, terrorism, natural disasters -- times are hard, there's no question. But times have been harder. We've been through worse and bounced back. If nothing else, I hope this week's Talking Pictures helps, in some small way, to put our own problems in perspective.


Courtesy Angelica Paez

One of my jobs
20 miles from home
I'd go anywhere that I could make a living
Do you know of anything back there

Little beggar begging for pennies, showing he has none
Bermuda


Just smilin through -- though it's grim here -- J

It doesn't get much grimmer than this:

Moved to Detroit
where Doris Jean + Elenore Ruth were born.
both died - Doris Jean at 11 mo. spinal meningitis
Elenore Ruth at 4 mo. malnutrition
No $ for food


Rock wall near Rose Bowl, Pasadena Cal.
where Dorothy found a Baby Girl on Jan. 24 1961.

Re: the above, you can picture my surprise when I found this one -- especially given that I found it at the monthly Rose Bowl Swap Meet, not a quarter mile from where this photo was taken.

Even though the chronology doesn't work, it's easy to imagine that baby growing up to be this little girl, the sickly and pathetically adorable Elaine, who carried her cat around in a basket.

you can see Cecilia can't smile to good with stitches in her lip


Broken Back Brigade
Station Hospital, Benning, Ga
1-2-3-1945
One Bad Jump.

Courtesy Angelica Paez.

After auto accident

I hope Mr. Whiskers pulled through:

Also courtesy Angelica, perhaps the second-craziest picture I have ever seen:

This being the first:

American Fork Canyon, Utah. Taken by C.B. Arentson, July 27, 1918. 504 head of sheep killed by lightning on July 22. Owned by Smith Bros.

And just when you think things can't get any worse:

If they can bounce back from all that, surely we can.

And finally, the coping strategy of a woman who's seen more trouble than any of us.

Check out more Talking Pictures:
Hide This Please
The Dead
Love and Marriage
Life During Wartime

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Space
Google Street View Now Lets You Explore the International Space Station

Google Street View covers some amazing locations (Antarctica, the Grand Canyon, and Stonehenge, to name a few), but it’s taken until now for the tool to venture into the final frontier. As TechCrunch reports, you can now use Street View to explore the inside of the International Space Station.

The scenes, photographed by astronauts living on the ISS, include all 15 modules of the massive satellite. Viewers will be treated to true 360-degree views of the rooms and equipment onboard. Through the windows, you can see Earth from an astronaut's perspective and a SpaceX Dragon craft delivering supplies to the crew.

Because the imagery was captured in zero gravity, it’s easy to lose a sense of your bearings. Get a taste of what ISS residents experience on a daily basis here.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
Original image
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

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