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Morning Cup of Links: Unpopular Science

A conversation with Gary Trudeau as Doonesbury Turns 40. The comic is "...a soap opera, a tragedy, a comedy, an investigative agency, a liberal political commentary, a scourge of pomposity and corruption, a humanitarian exercise, all rolled into one." (via Metafilter)
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Christoph Neimann illustrated the laws of physics as they apply to our daily lives. Now I can blame gravity for the fact that I am attracted to the refrigerator.  (via The Daily What)
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They've finally found a way to make robot hands sensitive enough to grasp different types of objects. The secret is coffee grounds stuffed into a latex balloon. (via  Neatorama)
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Watch a dog play Yatzee. Is this border collie really lucky, or is he cheating?
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The 7 Most Unintentionally Creepy Places on the Internet. You can read about them without actually going to these websites. NSFW text.
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A crow takes a bath with no force or threats whatsoever. When will he take another? "Nevermore."
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The Art of the Jack-O-Lantern: More than just a pretty face! Pumpkins are not only a great art medium, but they are displayed in more homes than other kinds of sculpture.

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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video
A Tour of the New York Academy of Medicine's Rare Book Room
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The Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine documents the evolution of our medical knowledge. Its books and artifacts are as bizarre as they are fascinating. Read more here.

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