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10 Amazing Eyeless Animals

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Eyeless animals can seem almost alien compared to those we're used to, but a lack of sight doesn't have to mean a loss in senses or abilities.

The one in the picture above is an olm, which lives in the southeastern Europe’s Dinaric Alps. The people of Slovenia and Croatia call it the "human fish" because of its pale, pinkish flesh. The olm can live up to 100 years, but it stays in its gill-breathing larval stage its entire life. The critter is such an icon in Slovenia that it was even featured on their coins before the country switched to the Euro.

For more fascinating facts about eyeless animals, check out this excellent article on WebEcoist.

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Weird
Watch Plastic Skeletons Being Made in a 1960s Factory
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The making of human teaching skeletons used to be a grisly affair, involving the manipulation of fresh—or not-so-fresh—corpses. But as this video from British Pathé shows, by the 1960s it was a relatively benign craft involving molded plastic and high temperatures, not meat cleavers and maggots.

The video, accented by groan-worthy puns and jaunty music, goes inside a factory in Surrey that produces plastic skeletons, brains, and other organs for use in hospitals and medical schools. The sterile surroundings marked a shift in skeleton production; as the video notes, teaching skeletons had long come from the Middle East, until countries started clamping down on exporting human remains. Before that, human skeletons in Britain and the United States were often produced with a little help from grave-robbers, known as the Resurrection Men. After being dissected in anatomical classes at medical schools, the stolen corpses were often de-fleshed and transformed into objects for study. The theft of these purloined bodies, by the way, started several of America's first riots. Far better they be made out of plastic.

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Weird
The Origins of 25 Monsters, Ghosts, and Spooky Things
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Though dressing up as an angel is acceptable, it’s ghouls and goblins that truly capture our imaginations during the Halloween season. As lit jack-o’-lanterns beckon and monsters lurk in the shadows, we explore the origins of 25 frightful things that go bump—or boo—in the night.

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