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"Hallelujah" 10 Ways

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"Hallelujah" is a song written by Leonard Cohen in 1984, and never officially released as a single. It has become famous mainly through cover versions, and has been recorded by hundreds of artists. In 2008, American Idol contestent Jason Castro sang a version that caused Jeff Buckley's famous cover to rocket to the top of the Billboard Hot Digital Songs chart (you know, the kids these days with their iTunes and what-not). Buckley's rendition became a Platinum single on April 22, 2008, eleven years after his death and fourteen years after its original release -- despite never being officially released as a single.

"Hallelujah" has appeared in endless TV shows and movies. According to Wikipedia, it has appeared in: The West Wing, Crossing Jordan, Without a Trace, The O.C., Scrubs, House, Criminal Minds, ER, Third Watch, Ugly Betty, and LAX; and the films Feast of Love, The Edukators, Vinterkyss and Lord of War. I also happen to know it popped up in The Watchmen, The L Word, Shrek, and probably many more. This song is everywhere.

Here are ten of the best-known versions of the song. There are actually so many "well-known" covers of "Hallelujah" that I couldn't include them all in a top 10 -- go search YouTube for more. (One very notable version is the one by Espen Lind featuring Kurt Nilsen, Alejandro Fuentes and Askil Holm, which cannot be embedded.)

1. Jeff Buckley (Live in Studio)

Although this version differs a little from his famous album version (it has a longer intro), Jeff Buckley's is the most famous cover of "Hallelujah." It was inspired by John Cale's version (#4 below) and was released on Buckley's album "Grace" in 1994.

2. Rufus Wainwright

Wainwright's version is nearly as famous as Buckley's, because it appeared on the Shrek soundtrack (despite John Cale's version actually being used in the film). Wainwright's album version is actually my favorite version of the song. Another notable Wainwright performance is from the Leonard Cohen documentary "I'm Your Man," and includes vocals from Joan Wasser (Buckley's girlfriend) and Martha Wainwright.

3. k.d lang

It's not news that k.d. lang can really, really sing. But still, her vocal control in this live version is stunning. The last note goes on forever, and the video includes nearly a full minute of standing ovation. If this doesn't make you cry, I don't know what will.

4. John Cale

John Cale is credited for popularizing Cohen's song with his early cover. This arrangement seemed really weird to me until I listened to it several times. Watch John Cale and a string quartet perform the classic song in 1992.

5. Sheryl Crow

Crow speeds it up a bit, and her guitar treatment is different than most -- she capos on the first fret. Wicked. (For guitar nerds, most versions are performed capo'd at the 5th fret and played in "G", thus sung in the key of C.)

6. Allison Crowe

Crowe's album "Tidings" featured songs recorded in a single take. Here's one of them.

7. Damien Rice

Performed in 2008, at Leonard Cohen's induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Also interesting to see that he's playing capo'd at the third fret. See a more emotional/quiet version from Rice here.

8. Justin Timberlake and Matt Morris

Part of the "Hope for Haiti Now" benefit in January, 2010. Sorry about the weird popup YouTube thingies embedded here -- don't click them -- but this version actually has the best sound of any on YouTube.

9. Regina Spektor

Live in 2005, with phrasing more like Cohen's than most covers. Audio only.

10. Leonard Cohen

Of course, Leonard Cohen actually wrote the song in the first place. Check out that last verse. Cohen reportedly said of the song: "I wanted to write something in the tradition of the hallelujah choruses but from a different point of view.... It's the notion that there is no perfection -- that this is a broken world and we live with broken hearts and broken lives but still that is no alibi for anything. On the contrary, you have to stand up and say 'hallelujah' under those circumstances."

A Note for Non-Musicians

The lyrics "it goes like this, the fourth, the fifth, the minor fall, and the major lift" refer to the chord progression of the song itself as those lyrics are sung. Although the verse is about King David, the lyrics now seem like Cohen is winking at the listener -- teaching future generations with his own lyrics in the first verse how to cover his song. The chords to this bit are: C, F (the fourth), G (the fifth), A minor (the minor fall), and F (the major lift).

Today is October 10, 2010—10.10.10. To celebrate, we've got all our writers working on 10 lists, which we'll be posting throughout the day and night. To see all the lists we've published so far, click here.

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Animals
Australian Charity Releases Album of Cat-Themed Ballads to Promote Feline Welfare
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An Australian animal charity is helping save the nation’s kitties one torch song at a time, releasing a feline-focused musical album that educates pet owners about how to properly care for their cats.

Around 35,000 cats end up in pounds, shelters, and rescue programs every year in the Australian state of New South Wales, according to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). Microchipping and fixing cats, along with keeping closer tabs on them, could help reduce this number. To get this message out, the RSPCA’s New South Wales chapter created Cat Ballads: Music To Improve The Lives Of Cats.

The five-track recording is campy and fur-filled, with titles like "Desex Me Before I Do Something Crazy" and "Meow Meow." But songs like “I Need You” might tug the heartstrings of ailurophiles with lyrics like “I guess that’s goodbye then/but you’ve done this before/the window's wide open/and so’s the back door/you might think I’m independent/but you’d be wrong.” There's also a special version of the song that's specifically designed for cats’ ears, featuring purring, bird tweets, and other feline-friendly noises.

Together, the tunes remind us how vulnerable our kitties really are, and provide a timely reminder for cat owners to be responsible parents to their furry friends.

“The Cat Ballads campaign coincides with kitten season, which is when our shelters receive a significantly higher number of unwanted kittens as the seasons change,” Dr. Jade Norris, a veterinary scientist with the RSPCA, tells Mental Floss. “Desexing cats is a critical strategy to reduce unwanted kittens.”

Listen to a song from Cat Ballads below, and visit the project’s website for the full rundown.

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technology
ABBA Is Going on Tour—As Holograms
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Missed your chance to watch ABBA perform live at the peak of their popularity? You’re in luck: Fans will soon be able to see the group in concert in all their chart-topping, 1970s glory—or rather, they’ll be able to see their holograms. As Mashable reports, a virtual version of the Swedish pop band is getting ready to go on tour.

ABBA split up in 1982, and the band hasn't been on tour since. (Though they did get together for a surprise reunion performance in 2016.) All four members of ABBA are still alive, but apparently not up for reentering the concert circuit when they can earn money on a holographic tour from the comfort of their homes.

The musicians of ABBA have already had the necessary measurements taken to bring their digital selves to life. The final holograms will resemble the band in the late 1970s, with their images projected in front of physical performers. Part of the show will be played live, but the main vocals will be lifted from original ABBA records and recordings of their 1977 Australian tour.

ABBA won’t be the first musical act to perform via hologram. Tupac Shakur, Michael Jackson, and Dean Martin have all been revived using the technology, but this may be one of the first times computerized avatars are standing in for big-name performers who are still around. ABBA super-fans will find out if “SOS” still sounds as catchy from the mouths of holograms when the tour launches in 2019.

[h/t Mashable]

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