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Weekend Links: Internet Animal Orchestra

Flossy reader Margaret sent in this great link: "Have you ever seen a period film and thought, 'that costume looks familiar'? Well, you're not crazy, they do recycle them!" Recycled Movie Costumes is truly a labor of love, and if you adore period pieces then you will probably be familiar with quite a few of the featured frocks!
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As if Reality TV couldn't get any more embarrassing, Ranker.com has managed to put together a list of 12 Cringeworthy Reality TV Show FAILs that will just make you feel even more uncomfortable than usual watching these shows!
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We already know that reality show contestants will do a lot of things for money. But what about you? You may not actually have the option of shaving your eyebrows and never letting them grow back for $1 million, but you can vote whether you would do it or not and see how you compare with everyone else ('s levels of shame).
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We've heard auto-tuning of the news, interviews, and all sorts of unusual things ... but are you prepared for auto-tuned animals? The Internet Animal Orchestra is a cacophony of critter voices, all enhanced to carry a rather catchy beat.
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They may not be as controversial as a dress made out of meat, but these food-based fashion accessories are worth some attention.
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In some cases, what's old is new again. But you just don't hear of little boys anymore with names like "Leslie" and "Walter." Matthew, Michael, Christopher, James have remained among the top ten most popular American names for baby boys a hundred years running, says the Social Security Administration, and they won't be going out of style any time soon. Here are some "forgotten names" and a few words from modern day men who sport them. Do any of you guys have old-fashioned names? Is it a blessing or a curse?
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From the Department of Addicting Entertainment comes a ski game where you are the mountain.
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What do emeralds, a snake and a suit or armor have in common? They are all some of the strangest items found in lost luggage.
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From Flossy friend Jan, an interactive exploration of Monet's works, including a journey through his life. One of the most expertly executed websites I've seen in awhile. Afterwards, stay inspired by viewing some of these amazing human body flowers.
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A big thanks as always to everyone who sent in links this week! Remember to send your finds to FlossyLinks@gmail.com

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Stradivarius Violins Get Their Distinctive Sound By Mimicking the Human Voice
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Italian violinist Francesco Geminiani once wrote that a violin's tone should "rival the most perfect human voice." Nearly three centuries later, scientists have confirmed that some of the world's oldest violins do in fact mimic aspects of the human singing voice, a finding which scientists believe proves "the characteristic brilliance of Stradivari violins."

Using speech analysis software, scientists in Taiwan compared the sound produced by 15 antique instruments with recordings of 16 male and female vocalists singing English vowel sounds, The Guardian reports. They discovered that violins made by Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari, the pioneers of the instrument, produce similar "formant features" as the singers. The resonance frequencies were similar between Amati violins and bass and baritone singers, while the higher-frequency tones produced by Stradivari instruments were comparable to tenors and contraltos.

Andrea Amati, born in 1505, was the first known violin maker. His design was improved over 100 years later by Antonio Stradivari, whose instruments now sell for several million dollars. "Some Stradivari violins clearly possess female singing qualities, which may contribute to their perceived sweetness and brilliance," Hwan-Ching Tai, an author of the study, told The Guardian.

Their findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. A 2013 study by Dr. Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus at Texas A&M University, also pointed to a link between the sounds produced by 250-year-old violins and those of a female soprano singer.

According to Vox, a blind test revealed that professional violinists couldn't reliably tell the difference between old violins like "Strads" and modern ones, with most even expressing a preference for the newer instruments. However, the value of these antique instruments can be chalked up to their rarity and history, and many violinists still swear by their exceptional quality.

[h/t The Guardian]

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Orange-Themed Trivia
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