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Woody's Winners, NFL Week 5

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NFL WEEK FIVE:

Woody ended last week with an even 7-7 record, correctly choosing the Rams in an upset, but blanking by choosing the Dolphins on MNF. That puts me at 34-28 for the year, not bad for a season that’s been wild and wacky one-quarter of the way through. How wacky? Indianapolis has lost two of their first four games, Dallas is in last place in the NFC East, and Kansas City is the league’s only undefeated team. We’ve had TD catches that weren’t, umpires in different spots, several QB flip-flops, and a whole bunch of last-second victories. You want upsets? I predict some upsets. Here's what's in store for Week 5:

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Tampa Bay (2-1) @ Cincinnati (2-2)

The Buccaneers have won three straight road games, and the Florida team will feel at home when they see all the orange up in Cincinnati. (Bucs head coach Raheem) Morris hopes that his finicky defense returns to the form they displayed early in the season. The Bengals won’t run the table on the AFC North this year, thanks to last week’s loss at Cleveland. A solid victory is the only remedy, and It’ll take more than a parrot and an eye patch to make the Tigers do any plank-walking.

Woody’s Winner: Cincinnati

FACT: The Bucs are undefeated in their last five games vs. the Bengals.

Click "more" to see my picks on the other games in Week 5.

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Atlanta (3-1) @ Cleveland (1-3)

The Falcons escaped last week’s matchup with San Francisco by the tips of their talons, but a win is a win. This week, the flock will gather in formation over Lake Erie, ready to dive-bomb a bunch of Browns coming off their first victory of the year. Cleveland has lost three games by a combined 12 points, so the Dawg Defense may hold its own for a quarter or two. But there’s a reason that Georgia’s state bird is the Brown Thrasher.

Woody’s Winner: Atlanta

FACT: The Falcons have the NFC’s longest current winning streak (3 games).

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N.Y. Giants (2-2) @ Houston (3-1)

The Giants defense was off-the-scale awesome vs. Chicago last week, limiting the Bears to 3 points and only 110 yards of offense. They won’t manage those kinds of numbers against the more balanced Texans, who has the personnel to counter most any defensive scheme. With 7 fumbles and 6 interceptions, New York has trouble holding on to the ball, and this tendency may haunt them in front of a hostile house of hollerin’ Houston fans. If Andre (not the Giant) Johnson feels well enough to play, Oiltown may gush with excitement, but Woody senses that it’s time for a return to Earth at Space Center Houston.

Woody’s Winner (in an upset): New York

FACT: Last week, the Giants defense recorded 10 sacks and held Chicago’s offense to 0-for-13 on third-down attempts.

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Kansas City (3-0) @ Indianapolis (2-2)

By this time last season, Indy was undefeated while Kansas City was winless, but oh, how things have changed. But let’s be honest; the Colts are better than their record indicates, and the Chiefs won’t be lossless much longer. Fresh off their bye and with two weeks to prepare, the KC Masterpiece saunters into Indy hoping to hang a third “L” on Peyton Manning and crew. They’ll make a game of it, but the tribal leaders won’t be able to catch those speedy young horses.

Woody’s Winner: Indianapolis

FACT: Twice in the last two games, opposing offensive lineman have accused Chiefs DE Shaun Smith of illegally grabbing them in their “privates.”

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Green Bay (3-1) @ Washington (2-2)

QB Donovan McNabb returned to his former home in Philly last week and led the Redskins to a victory. This week, he returns to FedEx Field hoping to deliver a message to the rest of the NFC. Both teams are missing their top running backs, so Woody expects McNabb and the Pack’s Aaron Rodgers to put on a scrambling show as they try to outdo one another. Statistically, Washington has one of the worst pass defenses, while Green Bay has one of the best. The Cheese stands alone.

Woody’s Winner: Green Bay

FACT: The Packers lead the NFC with an average 26.5 points per game.

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Jacksonville (2-2) @ Buffalo (0-4)

After a brutal three-game stretch (Packers, Patriots, Jets), the Bills finally meet an opponent they might be able to corral. Jacksonville had to play a near-perfect game to beat the Colts last week, and the herculean effort may have taken its toll. Buffalo seems to show fire every other week, hanging tough against Miami in Week 1 and New England in Week 3. Here in Week 5, rookie C.J. Spiller gets his first start at RB for the home team, and he’ll kick into high-gear as the star attraction in the Wild West Show.

Woody’s Winner (in an upset): Buffalo

FACT: Buffalo is the only AFC team that has not recorded a win yet this season.

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Denver (2-2) @ Baltimore (3-1)

Kyle Orton and the league’s top-gaining air attack rumbles into Maryland in Week 5 to face Ray Lewis and the league’s best pass defense. Denver doesn’t pretend to run the ball with Knowshon Moreno out of the lineup, so unless they have some fancy pass plays drawn up, the Broncos will be pondering weak and weary by the time the final whistle blows. The Mile-High Men have never beaten the Ravens in Baltimore, and I don’t believe that will change in 2010.

Woody’s Winner: Baltimore

FACT: The Ravens have held opponents to a league-low 235.8 yards per game.

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Chicago (3-1) @ Carolina (0-4)

QB Jay Cutler is responsible for the Bears’ winning record this season, and his absence in Sunday’s game may just be the “anther” that the Panthers have been looking for. Chicago RB Matt Forte has done most of his damage as a receiver, while Carolina RB DeAngelo Williams has run like a big cat in his last two performances. This is one of three games this week where I’m predicting an 0-4 team to win, so here’s hoping that the Bear hunting is primo in the Piedmont.

Woody’s Winner (in an upset): Carolina

FACT: The home team has won each of the four previous regular-season meetings between these two teams.

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St. Louis (2-2) @ Detroit (0-4)

It’s rare that the Lions are favored to win a game, even at home. Head coach Jim Schwartz is well aware that his team needs a notch in the “W” column to match their improved statistics. The new-look Rams have impressed this season under rookie QB Sam Bradford, and if Detroit continues to shoot themselves in the foot, it may be another long Sunday in Motown. It’ll be close, but the Kings of the Jungle will score enough points to eke out an all-too-infrequent win.

Woody’s Winner: Detroit

FACT: The Lions have scored 82 points, fourth-most of the 16 teams in the NFC.

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New Orleans (3-1) @ Arizona (2-2)

So it seems that ex-Brown Derek Anderson was not the QB solution in Arizona. (Say it with me: Duh.) Rookie Max Hall took over in the last half of Week 4’s loss, and he’ll get the start this time around. Unfortunately, he’ll be facing the defending Super Bowl champs, whose defense has been salivating at the film of the BYU stud being sacked 6 times (and fumbling once) last week. The Cardinals’ even record is deceiving, having scraped by at home against St. Louis and Oakland. Facing New Orleans takes things to a different level, and even though I’m not Catholic, even I know that Saints outrank Cardinals.

Woody’s Winner: New Orleans

FACT: Despite allowing more than twice as many points (118) as they’ve scored (58), the Cardinals are in first place in the NFC West.

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San Diego (2-2) @ Oakland (1-3)

Just as Arizona’s 2-2 record belies their team’s ability, the Chargers’ identical record is similarly deceiving. San Diego is 0-2 on the road like the Cards, but they were competitive in those games. In Week 5, they head up the California coast to challenge the Silver-and-Black at Oakland Coliseum. New QB Bruce Gradkowski’s willingness to throw the ball downfield has helped open things up for RB Darren McFadden, and the Raiders have shown a spark that hasn’t been there for a while. Sadly, a spark isn’t much when compared to the power of a lightning bolt.

Woody’s Winner: San Diego

FACT: The Chargers’ offense leads the NFL in yardage per game, and their defense is ranked second in the league for fewest yards allowed.

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Tennessee (2-2) @ Dallas (1-2)

It’ll be a warm day in Dallas, but Tennessee hopes to fly in a giant Titan-ic iceberg to cool off the home crowd. Both teams have lost some hard-fought games this season: Dallas has moved the ball but not scored, while the Titans have scored while struggling to get yardage. While no game at this point in the season is a must-win, should the Stars falter this week, the price of steak may go way up as eastern Texas extracts its revenge on beef cattle statewide. But with a stellar 16-5 record after bye weeks, America’s Team will feast on Tennessee veal instead.

Woody’s Winner: Dallas

FACT: Last August during a preseason game, the Titans’ A.J. Trapasso became the first to bounce a punt off the then-new video screen at Cowboys Stadium.

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Philadelphia (2-2) @ San Francisco (0-4)

The 49ers deserved a victory last week in Atlanta, but “should have” doesn’t show up in the standings. Meanwhile, the Eagles have gone from flop to flip to flop again as QB Kevin Kolb returns to the starter’s spot. His line last week was not horrible, but would have been better had Jason Avant been able to haul in a winning TD pass that bounced off his mitts. (Alas, he was Avant-guarded.) Frisco coach Mike Singletary’s job may hinge on his team’s performance at home this week, so he’ll be doing all he can to ready his Gold Miners against the High Fliers. “Dangnabbit, ah hates those varmints!”

Woody’s Winner: San Francisco

FACT: The Eagles scored 38, 38, and 40 points in their three most recent road games in San Francisco.

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Minnesota (1-2) @ N.Y. Jets (3-1)

There’s plenty of drama this week on Monday Night Football. Brett Favre returns to the Big Apple to face his 2008 team, the Jets, and he’ll have recently-acquired Randy Moss lined up at WR for the first time this season. The Vikings had a bye last week, and it’s anyone’s guess whether the time off helped or hindered Minnesota’s chemistry. It’s Woody’s opinion that the Jet stream will keep those Norse ships from docking. And you can’t pillage while treading water.

Woody’s Winner: New York

FACT: The home team has only won two of five Monday Night Football games this season.

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BYE: Dolphins, Patriots, Steelers, Seahawks

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Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below, but please be cordial to others; this is all in good fun. Thanks!

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Arizona Teen Becomes First Female to Earn a College Football Scholarship
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iStock

In recent years, women have made great strides in male-dominated sports. Currently in the NBA, Becky Hammon and Nancy Lieberman have proven their worth as assistant coaches for the San Antonio Spurs and Sacramento Kings, respectively, while Sarah Thomas made news as the first official female referee in the NFL in 2015. Now, an Arizona teenager named Becca Longo is joining their ranks.

On April 12, Longo, an 18-year-old kicker from Basha High School in Chandler, Arizona, signed a letter of intent to receive an athletic scholarship and play for the Division II football team at Adams State University in Alamosa, Colorado. She is the first woman to be on scholarship at a Division II school or higher—a fact Longo herself didn't even realize until her high school coach informed her at the signing ceremony.

Longo’s kicking prowess in high school was highlighted by her making 30 out of 33 extra point attempts during her senior season, which caught the attention of Adams’s head coach, Timm Rosenbach. She also sent the school a highlight reel and began following coach Rosenbach on Twitter to show him what she could do.

"She's kind of put herself out there to let everyone know she wants to do this," Rosenbach told CNN. "If she's able to compete at a level we think she's able to compete at, we should afford her that opportunity to do that."

Longo’s persistence led to a visit from Adams’s offensive coordinator, Josh Blankenship, who told the young kicker that the school was interested in her being on the team. But being on scholarship doesn’t mean a spot on the starting roster is guaranteed. The kicking spot is up for grabs, according to Rosenbach, and there are two other kickers who Longo will have to beat out for the job. But despite the pressure, Longo told ESPN, "I'm ready to compete. I don't really have any expectations beyond that."

In addition to the football team, Longo has also committed to play basketball at Adams State next year.

[h/t CBS]

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Dan Witkowski
Oral History: The Strangest Super Bowl Halftime Show Ever
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Dan Witkowski

January 22, 1989: The San Francisco 49ers edge out the Cincinnati Bengals 20-16 to become the National Football League champions at Super Bowl XXIII at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida. It was a thrilling game, tied at the half—a Super Bowl first—and decided only in the closing moments with a successful pass from 49ers star quarterback Joe Montana. There was enough action to keep any football fan’s mind occupied for days.

But the next morning, all anyone wanted to talk about was Elvis Presto.

In one of the most unusual halftime presentations in the 50-year history of the event, the NFL commissioned a 1950s musical revue, led by a magician dressed as Elvis Presley who performed “the world’s largest card trick.” It was also, by the estimate of at least one soda company, the world’s largest eye exam: Coca-Cola and NBC presented the entire spectacle in 3-D, urging the show’s 54 million households to pick up a pair of disposable glasses at their local distributor. (They also cautioned that if the effect didn’t work, your lack of eye coordination meant you might need to see an optometrist.) The end result was a curious blend of retro-kitsch performance and a 1980s version of interactive television.

To understand how this uneven mix of magic, music, and carbonation came together, mental_floss spoke with several of the producers and creative partners behind “BeBop Bamboozled,” including the magician who created it, the man whose Elvis was heard but not seen, and the soda marketing genius who turned a 3-D glasses shortage into priceless publicity. As it turns out, Katy Perry's Left Shark has nothing on fire-eaters in poodle skirts.

I. OUT OF THIN AIR

The story of 1989’s Super Bowl begins in 1986, when the NFL started soliciting proposals from entertainment production companies to plan for halftime shows in the years ahead. In addition to fielding presentations from Disney, Paramount, and other massive entities, the league heard from a man in Minnesota named Dan Witkowski. A veteran stage illusionist, Witkowski owned MagicCom, a small business focused on increasing revenue for companies by being “disruptive" and encouraging them to think outside the box.  

Dan Witkowski (Founder, MagicCom): I was looking to sell some network specials, but I would get laughed off. I thought, “Well, what’s bigger than a special? What has a built-in audience?” By going after something big, it would put us on the map. So I went after the Super Bowl.

Jim Steeg (Senior Vice President of Special Events, NFL, 1979 to 2005): Basically, we had the same people producing the halftime show over the years. By the time we did Up with People for a second time in 1986, we decided we wanted to bring in different producers with ideas for the halftime show.

Witkowski: I have something I call the Pretty Girl Theory: Everybody thinks somebody else is calling the pretty blonde to go out on a Saturday night, yet there she sits at home. People are just intimidated to make calls. I wasn’t.

Steeg: We were looking to book people for the 1988, 1989, and 1990 shows. We brought in probably six or seven different producers, and Dan was one of them. He called us.

Witkowski: Obviously, he got a lot of calls. But what I did was put the problem ahead of the pitch. And the problem I presented to the NFL was this: How do they take something big and make it even bigger by attracting more people? Historically, the halftime show meant it was time to get up and get a sandwich.

Steeg: I agreed to meet him in New York and hear him out.

Witkowski: I think he was intrigued about the magic idea. I didn’t give him an idea for a specific type of show, but I told him we’d welcome the opportunity to give an official presentation.

Steeg: [NFL Commissioner] Pete Rozelle only sat through a couple of them. He sat through Dan’s.

Witkowski: What the NFL did that tripped us up was when they requested a written outline sent in advance. It’s like trying to describe a cartoon. You can’t do it. You need visuals and sound. I had one of those projectors for a slide show. But it was in their rules, so I sent everyone there a leather-bound folder with a padlock on it. I had the key. They couldn’t open it until I arrived. I got calls from secretaries saying, “They’re going nuts. They’re trying to pick the locks.” It caused a big stir.

Steeg: Dan kind of wowed everybody at the meeting. He made a bowling ball appear out of a suitcase. It got things rolling.

Witkowski: He remembered that? The funny thing is, I had to do a performance in Nebraska that same night. I couldn’t get out of it, so I had to carry the bowling ball and the suitcase through Kennedy Airport. I got in line at security, put the ball on the conveyor belt, and was immediately surrounded by guards who wanted to know where it had come from.

Steeg: What we decided to do was have him co-produce the 1988 pre-game show so he could get some experience and learn the math. It was important for him to understand the logistics and the magnitude of the Super Bowl.

Witkowski: What I basically presented was the idea of hooking the audience through their involvement. At the time, we had developed a technique that would have allowed us to distribute millions of game cards through McDonald’s with a mechanism that could be triggered by holding them up to the TV screen at a certain point. It would reveal an image. I can’t go into details on how it works, but that was the essence of it.

John Gonzalez (Director, NBC): I recall going to the NFL offices in Manhattan for the first presentation about the magic show. I was excited about it, realizing it would be a challenge in the middle of a huge football production to shoot live magic and not give any of the tricks away. To figure out the correct angles, we were going to have to do it in a very controlled, very planned-out manner.

That planning would eventually grow complicated by another influence over the halftime proceedings. With Witkowski pitching Steeg and the NFL on a magic-themed, participatory show for the 1989 game, the league was also being courted by a more established partner: Coca-Cola, who would wind up becoming the Super Bowl’s first sole sponsor that same year. The company had been working on a promotion involving 3-D glasses with a twist: a California company, Nuoptix, had developed a process where an image would be clear (not distorted or blurry) to a viewer not wearing the cellophane lenses.

Michael Beindorff (Vice President of Marketing, Coca-Cola, 1978-1992): Steve Koonin, who runs the Atlanta Hawks now but worked for Coke back then, came to me with the idea for 3-D glasses. He brought the whole Moonlighting idea to me.

Steve Koonin (Vice President of Sports and Entertainment Marketing, Coca-Cola, 1986-2000): I met Terry Beard from Nuoptix on an airplane. He was a sound guy, a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and had invented what was called stereoscopic 3-D. He sent me a demo of it. Basically [by covering one eye with a dark lens, which you can do using sunglasses with the video below], it slows down one eye and tricks the brain. It’s the Pulfrich Effect. At the time, Moonlighting was the hottest show on TV, and I called the producer, Glenn Caron, and sold him on the idea of doing the season finale in 3-D. He loved it. We made 26 million pairs of glasses and wound up on the front page of over 200 newspapers.

Beindorff: They had actually written a script, but then the writer’s strike happened, and the whole deal fell apart.

Koonin: We’re sitting there paying rent on warehouses across the country full of glasses. We had taken over a Kleenex factory in Mexico to make them.

Beindorff: We were still excited by the idea of the 3-D. For its time, it was very well-done. We went to the NFL and NBC with the concept of doing the halftime show in 3-D.

Steeg: Coke was our partner at the time. We were always in constant communication.  

Beindorff: Really, the whole strategy behind the Super Bowl partnership was to launch a campaign around the fact that people were switching from sugary drinks like Pepsi to Diet Coke. It was intended for Diet Coke to surpass Pepsi as the number two drink.

Gonzalez: I first heard it as a rumor: “We might do it in 3-D.” I was excited about the idea, but wondered, “How would we do that?”

II. ELVIS PRESTO

In the summer of 1988, Witkowski had no idea Coca-Cola would come in at virtually the last minute with their 3-D promotion. Instead, he and Steeg tried to hammer out what his stadium-sized magic show was going to look like.

Jack Barkla (Production Designer): I think Dan initially had the idea of a 1950s retro drive-in theater, with dancers carrying picnic baskets onto the field. They’d sit down and pull a ripcord in the basket that would turn them into inflatable cars.

Witkowski: We knew we were going to have a magic theme. Whether it was contemporary or Medieval was all flexible during the presentation. The whole 1950s thing was pretty big at the time. Baby Boomers were trying to relive their youth, so we hooked on that.

Steeg: These things evolve on a daily basis. Whatever we discussed at the pitch meeting wasn’t what wound up happening. There is no, “This is what it is.”

Barkla: There was also something to do with pizza, large colorful slices of pizza being moved around by various people.

Witkowski: There was another illusion where the concept was, as everyone came into the stadium, we were going to take a Polaroid picture that would be developed by the time they got to their seats. At random, one was going to be selected, brought down to the field, and asked to hold up their photo. Everyone else held up a card under their seat, and the whole audience would form a pictogram of the audience member selected. But we realized we didn’t have time to bring people down to the stadium floor for the pictures.    

Steeg: Everything about it was big. I remember we had a press conference at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York to announce it, which was unusual. No one had ever announced a halftime show before.  

Coca-Cola

Witkowski: For some reason, we had Oscar-Mayer around. They came forward and wanted to supply lunch for all of the dancers. As a kind of joke, I said, “Okay, but I want to ride shotgun in the Wienermobile.” Sure enough, it showed up.

Witkowski would eventually settle on a trick that involved the audience using an “Applause-o-Meter” to pick one of four giant cards in the stadium, with the selected card's edges made up of held-up seat cushions. What he needed now was a master of ceremonies—someone to guide the audience and lead the melody of classic pop songs.

Steeg: Elvis Presto, yes. We felt it was a novel thing that got a lot of play. Who is he? What is he?

Witkowski: It was divine inspiration. [Laughs] I think once we settled on the 1950s music, it was natural to make Elvis Presley the lead magician. It was a nice play on words. We also had the Magic Wandas, who were his back-up singers.

Barkla: I had nothing to do with that.

Witkowski: We cast a guy who had played Elvis on Broadway. He had a very good look and had the moves down. Alex Cole, who had been a back-up dancer on Solid Gold, was his choreographer. And he wouldn’t have to sing. That was all prerecorded in New York.

Jody LoMedico (Vocal Performer, “Elvis Presto”): I had been performing since the 1970s, singing and doing commercial jingles. Someone once told me I sounded like Elvis, and it devastated me. I was never an impersonator.

Witkowski: We went to the Elvis estate. I felt that rather than it be a surprise for them, they would want the courtesy and an opportunity to respond. They couldn’t have been nicer and did it for minimal consideration.

LoMedico: A vocal contractor I knew said she had heard I did a pretty good Elvis. I had been trying to destroy any kind of resemblance to him. You want to be your own person. But it was the Super Bowl, so I was all in. We went in there and sang and sang and sang this seven-minute piece. "Devil in a Blue Dress," "Rock This Town," Stray Cats stuff, everything. I was there probably seven hours. When we were done, I couldn’t talk.

Witkowski: We had Donald Pippin, a Broadway legend, doing all the music.

LoMedico: When they saw me sing, they liked me so much they asked if I wanted to come to Florida and lip-sync my own voice. But I couldn’t be out of town for three weeks for rehearsal and everything else for $1500. They said, “Most people do this for free.” Well, your dancers, these kids from universities, they live to be on television. Great for them. No disrespect. Not for me.

While Witkowski tried to assemble a complete Elvis, Barkla and choreographers were thinking of how best to stage a production on something as volatile as a football field. Only cars made of plywood would be allowed on the grass.

Barkla: The grass in Florida is very different from the grass in Minnesota. It’s like moss. It doesn’t take much to destroy the surface.

Steeg: It’s about protecting the field, and also about what you can move on 100 yards of grass.

Barkla: They’d bring truckloads of dirt and grass seed on the field and dump it. I remember asking one of the NFL guys, “Doesn’t that change the height of the goalposts?” Because you keep raising the ground. He looked at me like no one had ever considered the question before.

III. SHOWTIME

As the clock wound down to perfect an elaborate show full of visual effects, dancers, and a stadium-sized card trick, Witkowski was dealt two of the worst hands possible: His in-person Elvis was about to split, and Coca-Cola was about to introduce a new dimension in frustration.

Witkowski: The guy playing Elvis suddenly had an opportunity to go shoot a commercial in Japan that was going to be very lucrative. We made a mutual decision to recast. My first thought was Alex, since he was essentially the other Elvis’s choreographer and knew a lot of the moves.

LoMedico: The guy who did Elvis—whoever you are, I wasn’t a fan, man. Doing Elvis at that time with anything was just hokey. Maybe in Middle America, but the East and West Coasts were done. It was Elvis and The National Enquirer. It was corny.

Alex Cole had roughly 10 days to learn a complex routine involving dancers and illusions with a hollowed-out jukebox and an electric guitar that materialized out of thin air. At the same time, NBC and Witkowski were struggling to cope with the late addition of 3-D.

Gonzalez: We both understood the sudden importance of the 3-D overlay and all the money it represented. The NFL and the executives at NBC didn’t interfere, but they did say, “This represents a whole lot of valuable promotion, so we need to make it work.” In the final week, the focus largely went away from the magic and onto re-blocking for 3-D.

Witkowski: We recorded the audio track before the 3-D element came into play, so we decided that because of time, we would edit what we had and work with it from that standpoint. We knew the magic would suffer, knew the event would be a bit corny, but felt people would watch.

Barkla: The input we got was way late in the game. That was very frustrating. If it hadn’t been so late, things would’ve been better than they were. It’s typical corporate stuff. The people making decisions didn’t have a clue as to how the whole thing worked.

Gonzalez: The choreographers had been planning their part of the show for months. To tell them two weeks before, “Throw it out, make everything counterclockwise rotational,” was not what they wanted to hear.

Witkowski: We thought of some effects where girls would appear to float outside the image of your TV set and had some other levitating effects. But with the 3-D process, things had to be in constant motion left to right to separate the field of vision for the effect to work. In many ways, the 3-D fought with the way to present magic, which was to keep a continuous camera on something so you’re not cutting away.

Steeg: To do the 3-D, everything had to move left to right. It was basically a mind trick.

Gonzalez: Fearing that the 3-D on the field would be less than what was expected, I went to my bosses at NBC with a request to spend additional funds on some animations. There are three or four spots in the show where we independently developed some effective use of the 3-D apart from the action on the field.

Koonin: Kevin Costner came up to me at a [pre-game] party in Miami. He said, “Hey, I hear you’re the 3-D glasses guy. Want to comp me a pair?”

With a pre-taped introduction by a wry Bob Costas (“This is the single proudest moment of my life”) and a 3-D Diet Coke commercial, “BeBop Bamboozled” got underway. Elvis Presto appears to materialize out of a jukebox; dancers defy gravity by leaning against parking meters horizontally; 102 custom-made Harley-Davidson bikes engulfed the margins of the field.

Gonzalez: Bob Costas was hesitant about pre-recording the opening. “Trust me,” I told him. “I need to do this to guarantee some effective 3-D effects.” We watched it together in the controlled environment of the studio and it looked quite good.

Barkla: Of course, we didn’t wind up using the inflatable cars. Those might have cost $3000 to $4000 each.

Witkowski: I remember in the planning stage, we had some early computer effects that showed how 2000 people would be moving on the field. That was unheard of back then. You could have 200 people fall over and it wouldn’t even be noticed.

Barkla: The question was, how do you get things on and off the field? You have to be able to set it up and dismantle it very quickly.

Presto's inciting of the crowd to "pick a card, concentrate real hard" left most viewers befuddled: the Applause-o-Meter led to the King of Hearts, one of four giant cards on the field and a choice Presto predicted. Because of the camera movements, it was also one of the few illusions actually picked up by the broadcast. 

Witkowski: I will say the card trick is not nearly as effective as what we had anticipated.

Steeg: I don’t think everyone got the card trick. You had to think about it.

Barkla: There was one master box for power, and it was at the 50-yard line. All the skyboxes would need wires running out of it. The place where we stored all the sets underneath wasn’t wired and it wasn’t lit at all. I found that really strange. We were running electric lines all over the place to get power.

Witkowski: We didn’t have theatrical lighting. In magic, you adjust it depending on how the performers are moving. Here, the lights were either on or off. We couldn’t rely on that. Everything was out in the open.

LoMedico: I think I made the right choice [not appearing on camera]. When I saw it, I thought, “Mmm. This isn’t working.”

Witkowski: I would say that Alex, as Elvis, didn’t have the right look. But he didn’t have the opportunity to practice, either. With magic and its complexities, it’s hard to just drop someone in.

LoMedico: The stuff sounded good in the studio. Everyone was really happy. But when it got on the air, whatever they did with the sound processing, somebody mixed that improperly.

Gonzalez: You get one rehearsal Friday night to try to put it all together, and the crew, the best in the business, was excited and cooperative. The next time the camera crew saw it was live at halftime.

IV. OVERTIME

With an estimated 120 million people tuning in, Super Bowl XXIII was a resounding success. Despite some complaints that the card trick made little sense, news media responded favorably to the 3-D effects. This was presuming the viewer had the glasses: Because Coke had only made 26 million pairs, many had to share or go without.

Koonin: There wasn’t time to make more. If it had cost the consumer money, yes, they probably would have been disappointed. But this was about getting past Pepsi. It was just a fun stunt.

Barkla: It was the beginning of a time when the shows got more inflated and slicker.

Witkowski: I remember being interviewed after. Apparently, I was dancing in the stands with the dancers.

Steeg: I think it was a good show. It was just so hyped. People were expecting this Pixar 3-D animation thing. It was just a halftime show.

Beindorff: We got a huge uptick in sales that month. And that went on for some period of time, though you can’t attribute it all to the Super Bowl. We also had George Michael.

Witkowski: Coke was kind enough to send us binders of all the press after the game. I think it was $60 million worth of promotion. It was confirmation that we were successful in creating something people were going to talk about.

Beindorff: I got a call a year or two ago that Diet Coke finally surpassed Pepsi as the number two drink. It took a while.

Steeg: The only one you’re concerned with is the Commissioner, and he [Rozelle] was happy.

Witkowski: Jim said to me, “You’ll reap the benefits of this for years.” And we have. MagicCom has been very successful. I appreciate that the NFL took a chance on the little guy.

Steeg: The next year was the 40th anniversary of Peanuts. They approached us and wanted to get involved, and we liked that.

Gonzalez: If you were to pick a halftime show that would be designed for the rotational 3-D effect, I don’t think it would be something that demands the precision and accuracy of a magic show.

Steeg: We experimented. We took chances. With the Super Bowl, it’s very easy to just say no. We rolled the dice.

LoMedico: At the time, I lived in the Poconos with no cable and had to watch it with rabbit ears. The whole thing was kind of a letdown.

Barkla: I didn’t watch it. I don’t like football.

All images courtesy of Dan Witkowski.

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