The Quick 10: 10 Things You Need to Know About “The Star-Spangled Banner”

filed under: q10
Image credit: 

On this day many years ago (1814, to be exact), Francis Scott Key saw the tattered remains of the American flag still blowing in the breeze after Fort McHenry had been bombarded by the British all night. The rest, as you probably know, is history. Here are a few facts about the poem (yes, poem) we know as the American national anthem today.

1. There really is a specific Star-Spangled Banner. It’s the flag Francis Scott Key saw when he was watching Fort McHenry being bombarded during the War of 1812 – his tale goes just like the song: after gunfire and rain all night, the flag was still standing when the sun rose. Inspired, Key wrote down what he was feeling – but when he wrote it, it was simply a poem called “Defense of Fort McHenry.” It became a song when Key’s brother-in-law discovered the poem perfectly fit the tune of a popular song called “The Anacreontic Song” (see #3). Although the song was played at public events and on patriotic occasions from that point on, it wasn’t officially named as the national anthem until after Robert Ripley of Ripley’s Believe it or Not noted in his cartoon that “Believe It or Not, America has no national anthem.” John Philip Sousa rallied for The Star-Spangled Banner to become the new national anthem, and on March 3, 1931, Herbert Hoover signed a law making it so.

2. Other contenders for the national anthem included “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” “Hail Columbia” and “America the Beautiful.”

3. Before it was a national anthem, the tune belonged to a popular British drinking song. The anthem takes its melody from “The Anacreontic Song” or “To Anacreon in Heaven,” a British drinking song sung by members of London’s Anacreontic Society. Check out the original lyrics and sheet music.

4. One version of the lyrics, handwritten by Francis Scott Key himself in 1840, changes the version we all know so well. It’s a subtle change, though: "Whose bright stars and broad stripes, through the clouds of the fight.” This version is now housed in the Library of Congress.

5. It’s a hard song to sing musically because it stretches vocals an octave and a half, but it’s apparently a hard song to remember lyrically as well – at least for some people.

In 1965, Robert Goulet sang the national anthem before the big Sonny Liston-Muhammad Ali fight. The crowd wanted to fight him, however, when he botched the lyrics right from the start: “Oh, say can you see, by the dawn’s early night.”

"I walked into that town and I was a hero. Then the fight lasted a minute and half and I walked out of town and I was a bum," he said.

And last year, Jesse McCartney was asked to sing the famous song before the NASCAR Pepsi 500. He went right from “Oh, say can you see, by the dawn’s early light,” to “Whose broad stripes and bright stars…” Whoops! McCartney chalked it up to stage fright. See for yourself:

6. A fifth stanza was added to the song in 1861 during the Civil War. It’s little-known today, but it appeared in songbooks and sheet music at the time. It goes like this:

When our land is illumined with liberty's smile,
If a foe from within strikes a blow at her glory,
Down, down with the traitor that tries to defile
The flag of the stars, and the page of her story!
By the millions unchained,
Who their birthright have gained
We will keep her bright blazon forever unstained;
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave,
While the land of the free is the home of the brave.

You might be surprised that there’s a fifth stanza – in fact, you might be surprised that there’s a second, third and fourth. The others are rarely played, but you might hear them on really formal occasions. You’ll almost never hear the third stanza, though, which is pretty anti-British. Here are the lyrics to the song in their entirety.

7. Ironically, Francis Scott Key’s grandson was imprisoned in the very place that inspired his granddad to write “The Star-Spangled Banner." In 1861, people of Baltimore deemed to be pro-South were jailed in Fort McHenry.

8. The song inspires all kinds of emotions in a lot of people, but there’s one instance where it really tugged at the heartstrings of the world. On September 12, 2001, the Buckingham Palace band played the American national anthem during their Changing of the Guard. The gesture of solidarity and show of support was repeated for Spain (with their national anthem, of course, not “The Star-Spangled Banner”) in 2004 after the bombings in Madrid.

9. The tradition of playing the national anthem before a baseball game wasn't standard until WWII. Before that, the song was typically reserved for the seventh-inning stretch.
10. “The Star-Spangled Banner” is so difficult to sing that Garrison Keillor has started a campaign to revert the song to its original key, G major. He argues that most singers are able to tackle that key with ease. So far, obviously, he has been unsuccessful.

More from mental_floss...

September 13, 2010 - 1:27pm
submit to reddit