10 People With Photographic Memories

Nikola Tesla, 1896.
Nikola Tesla, 1896.
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

It's hard to say whether photographic memory actually exists. So far, only one really conclusive test has ever been done to prove that there are certain individuals who can look at a massive quantity of information and remember it verbatim even years later. But there are plenty of people who have claimed to possess eidetic memory (that's the official term). Here are 10 of them.

1. NIKOLA TESLA

Nikola Tesla in his Colorado lab, 1899.
Nikola Tesla in his Colorado lab, 1899.
By Dickenson V. Alley, photographer, Century Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

According to Nikola Tesla himself, photographic memory was just one of his brain quirks. He said he had no problem memorizing entire books, but he also experienced random, blinding flashes of light that were sometimes accompanied by hallucinations. Tesla had detailed flashbacks to earlier parts of his life and could visualize his inventions in astonishing, complicated detail before he even started tinkering with making them come to life.

2. TEDDY ROOSEVELT

Portrait of Theodore Roosevelt, circa 1918.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Teddy Roosevelt could recite entire newspaper pages—not just articles—as if they were sitting in front of him. He was also a speed reader and is reported to have read two or three books a day.

3. KIM PEEK

Kim Peek was the real-life Rain Man; he was the person Dustin Hoffman's character was based on in the Oscar-winning 1988 movie. Peek, who died in 2009, was said to have memorized every word of every book he had ever read, estimated at around 9000. It took him up to just 12 seconds to read one page, and each eye could read a page independently.

"Kim's story tells us that the human brain is far more flexible than we had thought," psychiatrist Darold Treffert told The Observer in 2005. "Like many other savants, he has suffered disability in one area of his brain, but has compensated by acquiring remarkable new abilities in other areas. This shows we all have considerable hidden intellectual potential."

4. ABBIE HOFFMAN

Activist Abbie Hoffman, circa 1969.
By Richard O. Barry from San Diego, California, United States (Abbie Hoffman) // CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

In his 1968 book Revolution for the Hell of It, activist Abbie Hoffman claimed that he was able to remember things in great detail after merely a glance.

5. JERRY LUCAS

Portrait of Jerry Lucas, circa 1961.
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Jerry Lucas was an amazing basketball player whose career lasted from 1962 to 1974, and in 1996 was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. But it's his impressive memory that's paying the bills these days. Lucas has written dozens of books on memory, has developed a memory-retention system, and travels the country giving lectures on the subject. (Memorized lectures, we're sure.)

6. GUILLERMO DEL TORO

A photo of Guillermo del Toro
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images

Oscar-nominated filmmaker Guillermo del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, Hellboy, Pacific Rim) is said to have a photographic memory. Maybe that's why his movies are so visually interesting.

7. FERDINAND MARCOS

Photo of Ferdinand Marcos from 1976.
Amin Mohamed/Camerapix/Getty Images

The former president of the Philippines was said to have a photographic memory, which would have come in handy when cataloging his wife Imelda's shoes.

8. SERGEI RACHMANINOFF

Photo of composer Sergei Rachmaninoff from 1938.
Keystone/Getty Images

The composer may have had a type of photographic memory that helped him memorize sheet music with astonishing speed. This was aided by his extraordinary ear for music. Russian composer Alexander Siloti would give him complicated and demanding works to learn and Rachmaninoff (also spelled Rachmaninov) would have them completely memorized to perfection a day or two later.

9. MR. T

A photo of Mr. T
Brad Barket/Getty Images

Yes, that Mr. T. The man who was born Laurence Tureaud says that he didn't need to study in school because of his "photographic memory." "Most of the time I stared out the windows, just daydreaming," he once said.

10. ELIZABETH

Photo of Harvard University.
Harvard University.
iStock

No, not the Queen of England—just Elizabeth, a Harvard student who passed a series of tests that convinced even skeptics that eidetic memory existed in 1970. She was studied by scientist Charles Stromeyer III, who published the results of his findings in Nature, then went on to marry Elizabeth (who was never tested again). But in the decades since, many have questioned the results of Stromeyer's study.

The World's 10 Most Expensive Cities

An apartment complex in Hong Kong
An apartment complex in Hong Kong
iStock.com/Nikada

If you think San Francisco is pricey, you should see some of the other metropolises that appear in a new ranking of the 10 most expensive cities in the world. As The Real Deal reports, Singapore, Paris, and Hong Kong have been jointly named as the three cities with the highest cost of living in a new analysis by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU).

It was the first time in the history of the Intelligence Unit’s Worldwide Cost of Living report that three cities have tied for first place. Billing itself as a global business intelligence group, the EIU takes the prices of more than 400 items into consideration for its annual list, including food, clothing, household supplies, private school fees, and recreation.

Singapore's appearance on the list is no surprise, considering that it has been crowned the world’s most expensive city for the past five years in a row, and Paris has consistently made the top 10 since 2003. Hong Kong, meanwhile, rose three places in the newest ranking, while Osaka, Japan rose six places.

New York City and Los Angeles also made the top 10 list this year, tying with other cities for fourth and fifth place, respectively. This is partly due to exchange rates.

“A stronger U.S. dollar last year has meant that cities in the U.S. generally became more expensive globally, especially relative to last year’s ranking,” the report notes. “New York has moved up six places in the ranking this year, while Los Angeles has moved up four spots.”

Check out the 10 most expensive cities below, and visit the EIU’s website to download a full copy of the report.

  1. Singapore; Hong Kong; and Paris, france (tied)

  1. Zurich, Switzerland

  1. Geneva, Switzerland; and Osaka, Japan (tied)

  1. Seoul, South Korea; Copenhagen, Denmark; and New York City (tied)

  1. Tel Aviv, Israel and Los Angeles (tied)

5 Fast Facts About the Spring Equinox

iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg
iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg

The northern hemisphere has officially survived a long winter of Arctic temperatures, bomb cyclones, and ice tsunamis. Spring starts today, March 20, which means warmer weather and longer days are around the corner. To celebrate the spring equinox, hear are some facts about the event.

1. The spring equinox arrives at 5:58 p.m.

The first day of spring is today, but the spring equinox will only be here for a brief time. At 5:58 p.m. Eastern Time, the Sun will be perfectly in line with the equator, which results in both the northern and southern hemispheres receiving equal amounts of sunlight throughout the day. After the vernal equinox has passed, days will start to become shorter for the Southern Hemisphere and longer up north.

2. The Equinox isn't the only time you can balance an egg.

You may have heard the myth that you can balance on egg on its end during the vernal equinox, and you may have even tried the experiment in school. The idea is that the extra gravitational pull from the Sun when it's over the equator helps the egg stand up straight. While it is possible to balance an egg, the trick has nothing to do with the equinox: You can make an egg stand on its end by setting it on a rough surface any day of the year.

3. Not every place gets equal night and day.

The equal night and day split between the northern and southern hemispheres isn't distributed evenly across all parts of the world. Though every region gets approximately 12 hours of sunlight the day of the vernal equinox, some places get a little more (the day is 12 hours and 15 minute in Fairbanks, Alaska), and some get less (it's 12 hours and 6 minutes in Miami).

4. The name means Equal Night.

The word equinox literally translates to equal ("equi") and night ("nox") in Latin. The term vernal means "new and fresh," and comes from the Latin word vernus for "of spring."

5. The 2019 spring equinox coincides with a supermoon.

On March 20, the day the Sun lines up with equator, the Moon will reach the closest point to Earth in its orbit. The Moon will also be full, making it the third supermoon of 2019. A full moon last coincided with the first day of spring on March 20, 1981, and it the two events won't occur within 24 hours of each other again until 2030.

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