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Face Forward. Keep Your Mouth Shut. Look at These Savings!

When your wife is incredibly social (as mine is) and your son is the cutest child on earth (as mine is), you get used to participating in unwanted social interaction in public places. But even I can't get behind the actions of the Westfield Galleria - a mall in Roseville, California, that recently attempted to invoke a no socializing rule on all shoppers.

The shut up and shop policy was predictably struck down by a state appellate court, which declared the rule to be unconstitutional. This story in The Sacramento Bee fully explains the no talking rule this way:

The specific rule at issue prohibits a person in the center's common areas from "approaching patrons with whom he or she was not previously acquainted for the purpose of communicating with them on a topic unrelated to the business interests" of the mall or its tenants.

It continues with this hilarious caveat on banned discussion topics:

Weather is a no-no, unless one is intuitive enough to observe how it may be affecting the size of the crowd at the mall.

And even throws in this Draconian touch:

Another rule requires written applications for permission to make such contacts "to be submitted to the mall's security office four days in advance. Mall management will review the application to determine if the proposed activity is permissible."

[Via The Consumerist]

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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