Morning Cup of Links: The $21 Million Domain Name?

Maybe Steve Jobs is tired of taking on Microsoft "“ and wants to set his sights on toppling Schwinn instead. Probably not, but the fact that Apple filed for a patent on a new Smart Bicycle is still quite intriguing.
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From the size of it, you'd think the Oxford English Dictionary included every word known to man. But each year there is a list of "non-words" that don't make the cut. Many of the words and their definitions are so amusing that the fact that they were left out makes you want to "wibble."
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Crafty Memes is for those people who obsess over internet trends. The site provides printable internet meme templates "“ so that David After Dentist can easily sit on your car dashboard and Sad Keanu can weep gently from right atop your computer monitor.
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Billing it as the "Greatest Domain Name Ever," an eBay seller is attempting to sell the domain name HeidiandSpencer.com—for $21 million! Good luck with that. Personally, I'm still holding out for BurtandLoni.com. [Via RadarOnline]
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These artists turn old cassette tapes into amazing works of art. So, even your old Color Me Badd albums can become something great.
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With so many people tweeting, how do you really gain traction "“ and followers? HP analyzed 22-million tweets and think they have an answer. [Via CNET]
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Of all the ways there are to raise money for charitable causes, cramming 102 naked people on a roller coaster might be the strangest.
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As the Fantasy Football world starts to crank up for another year of stat-crunching, one famous sports columnist offers his advice on improving the entire experience.
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And finally, my recent trip to the State Fair inspires me to learn more about 10 famous circus performers.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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