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Test Your Color I.Q.

The human eye can distinguish about 10 million different colors, but how well can you put them in a straight line?

1 out of 255 women and 1 out of 12 men have some form of color vision deficiency. You're probably familiar with color blindness, but even just arguing hue with someone, or spending hours upon hours searching for the right paint tint shows that there's really a whole spectrum of color sense.

As a former art student, I just knew I'd be brilliant at this Color I.Q. test, in which you are asked to arrange color blocks to blend seamlessly from one end to another (Most art students have to go through color theory, exploring the gradient of shades between, say, white and green, and making the shades gradually lighter or darker). But pride cometh before the fall, and my score turned out to be a measly 38 (a perfect score is Zero, and imperfections increase from there).

Clearly I must blame an uncalibrated monitor and a glare on the screen (or accept why I am, in fact, a "former" art student). How did you Flossers fare?

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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A Tour of the New York Academy of Medicine's Rare Book Room
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The Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine documents the evolution of our medical knowledge. Its books and artifacts are as bizarre as they are fascinating. Read more here.

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