CLOSE
Original image

7 Memorable Sports Chants

Original image

Does your favorite team have a special chant? If not, here are seven examples that might inspire you to write one of your own.

1. "Two World Wars and One World Cup!"

You might have heard English fans reviving this old cheer if you watched the recent England-Germany World Cup match. The two countries have a long-standing rivalry—England won its only World Cup in 1966 in a final against West Germany—and it's hard to comment on their soccer battles without bringing up their military history. Another English cheer goes, "If you won the war, stand up!" In 1966, their rivalry inspired this gem of sportswriting:

"If, on the morrow, the Germans beat us at our national game, we'll do well to remember that, twice this century, we have beaten them at theirs."

2. "Pericles, Sophocles, Peloponnesian War; "¨X-Squared, Y-Squared, H2SO4; "¨Cosine, Tangent, Secant, Line; "¨Three point one four one five nine!"

I call this one The Great Nerd Chant.

A number of very geeky schools claim to have come up with it; some school-specific variations on the last two lines include: "Three point one four one five nine/ Come on Williams, hold that line!" and "Cosine, Tangent, Secant, Ray/ Swarthmore, Swarthmore, all the way!" I've also heard it attributed to University of Chicago. Or try these last verses:

"Two, Four, Six, Eight / God is dead and Nietzsche's great!"
"Kant, Hegel, Marx, Spinoza / "¨Come on team, hit 'em in the nosa."

3. "He's got a pineapple on his head!" (x4)

Sung to the tune of "He's got the whole world in his hands" (obviously). Another British footie chant, this one was used to make fun of Jason Lee of Nottingham Forest and his dreads.

4. "Oh ORU
Oh ORU
Oh OR University
Ordained for holy destiny
May your torch still burn
At the Lord's return
And count for eternity"

Oral Roberts University's "spirit song" is sung at sporting events to instill college pride. It has the tempo and verve of a football fight song, but morphs from sports cheer to hymn pretty quickly, seemingly more concerned with eternal salvation than the Golden Eagles' win-loss record.

5. "Drink Blood, Smoke Crack, Worship Satan, Go Mac!"

Macalester College, on the other hand, takes a slightly more cavalier approach to its ultimate destiny.

6. "Fight, Fight, Inner Light!
Kill, Quakers, Kill!
Knock 'em Down, Beat 'em Senseless!
Do It 'til We Reach Consensus!"

The origins of this one are unknown, but just about every Quaker college in the country uses this classic chant - Earlham, Goshen, Guilford, Haverford, and Swarthmore all claim it as their own. "Blood makes the grass grow! Kill, Quakers, Kill!" is another variation that appeals to the pacifist sensibilities of the Society of Friends, and then there's the old chestnut, "Stop multinational corporations from raping third-world countries. Go team."

7. "Fight exuberantly!
Fight exuberantly!
Compel them to relinquish the ball!"

This chant used by Earlham football cheerleaders in the 1970s might be my personal favorite. Persuasive, elegant, to-the-point—this cheer has it all. Interestingly enough, Earlham's mascot has changed from the Fightin' Quakers to the Hustlin' Quakers to simply the Quakers. The earlier two names were deemed too violent.
* * * * *
Did your high school or college have any amusing cheers, songs, or chants? What are some of your favorites?

twitterbanner.jpg

Original image
iStock
arrow
Big Questions
What's the Difference Between Vanilla and French Vanilla Ice Cream?
Original image
iStock

While you’re browsing the ice cream aisle, you may find yourself wondering, “What’s so French about French vanilla?” The name may sound a little fancier than just plain ol’ “vanilla,” but it has nothing to do with the origin of the vanilla itself. (Vanilla is a tropical plant that grows near the equator.)

The difference comes down to eggs, as The Kitchn explains. You may have already noticed that French vanilla ice cream tends to have a slightly yellow coloring, while plain vanilla ice cream is more white. That’s because the base of French vanilla ice cream has egg yolks added to it.

The eggs give French vanilla ice cream both a smoother consistency and that subtle yellow color. The taste is a little richer and a little more complex than a regular vanilla, which is made with just milk and cream and is sometimes called “Philadelphia-style vanilla” ice cream.

In an interview with NPR’s All Things Considered in 2010—when Baskin-Robbins decided to eliminate French Vanilla from its ice cream lineup—ice cream industry consultant Bruce Tharp noted that French vanilla ice cream may date back to at least colonial times, when Thomas Jefferson and George Washington both used ice cream recipes that included egg yolks.

Jefferson likely acquired his taste for ice cream during the time he spent in France, and served it to his White House guests several times. His family’s ice cream recipe—which calls for six egg yolks per quart of cream—seems to have originated with his French butler.

But everyone already knew to trust the French with their dairy products, right?

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Original image
iStock
arrow
science
Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
Original image
iStock

Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios