Make-A-Wish: Turning Kids Into Superheroes, Ice Cream Men & More

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The Make-A-Wish Foundation has granted nearly 200,000 wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions. From the first wish—making a 7-year-old boy with leukemia a police officer for a day—through countless family vacations and celebrity meetups, the foundation has provided all sorts of joy for seriously ill children and their families. Here is just a handful of wishes the foundation has fulfilled in recent years.

1. Superhero for a Day

This April, the Make-A-Wish Foundation granted an unusual wish to 13-year-old Erik Martin: it turned him into a superhero for a day. The Seattle boy transformed into his super secret identity, Electron Boy, to help Spider-Man with a dangerous mission. Nefarious supervillains Dr. Dark and Blackout Boy had imprisoned Major League Soccer's Seattle Sounders at Qwest Field, and only Electron Boy could use his powers to save them. After pulling on his red-and-blue costume, Electron Boy rushed to the stadium in a DeLorean driven by his trusty sidekick, Moonshine Maid, and rescued the team while his family and friends looked on and cheered.

After Electron Boy saved the team, the soccer players congratulated him and gave him his own jersey. As a sign of Seattle's gratitude, the city council gave him a key to the city while declaring it Electron Boy Day. Electron Boy, for his part, smiled for the TV cameras and flexed his muscles. The Electron Boy comic book was created by Ken Christiansen.

Such an elaborate wish certainly wasn't easy to pull off, but it really cheered up Erik Martin. His older sister told the Seattle Times, "He's over the moon. This is definitely beyond anything we thought it would be."

2. A Management Job in the Ice Cream Business

What kid hasn't considered the endless possibilities of becoming an ice cream man? You would have access to an unlimited supply of frozen treats! Five-year-old Robin had a much more sophisticated view of things, though. He didn't just want to be an ice cream man. When the Make-A-Wish Foundation asked Robin to make a wish, he asked, "Can you make me the boss of the ice cream man?"

Pretty sharp little guy. Robin figured that if the ice cream man worked for him, he could send down orders to give everyone free ice cream, even the kids in his neighborhood who sometimes couldn't afford a treat.
The Make-A-Wish folks made it happen. Robin got his own cap that said "Ice Cream Man," and he rode around the neighborhood with his normal ice cream man, taking orders from his chums and making sure that all of the frozen snacks were on the house.

3. Quality Time with Elmo

Like a lot of three-year-olds, Amanda is obsessed with Elmo. Sadly, though, Amanda is sick with a form of cancer that affects her liver. According to her parents, she spent all of her time in the hospital watching Elmo, playing with Elmo, or talking about Elmo, so when it came time to grant the Michigan girl a wish, the choice was easy: she had to meet Elmo.

Kevin Clash, the "muppeteer" who plays Elmo, canceled a previous engagement and flew to Michigan so Amanda could meet her favorite furry red monster. Amanda was understandably delighted, and the pair danced, sang songs, and laughed for an hour and a half. Make-A-Wish even shot a video of Amanda and Elmo playing together. Fair warning: it's so sweet that it will make you cry.

4. A Spot in the NFL Draft

Fifteen-year-old Zach Hatfield is a die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan who was diagnosed with leukemia last August. While many kids ask to meet their favorite team, Zach had a different request: he wanted to announce the Steelers' first-round pick in the 2010 NFL Draft. Thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Zach got to travel to Radio City Music Hall in April and announce on national TV that the Steelers had used the 18th pick in the draft on Florida center Maurkice Pouncey.

While Zach did a commendable job of announcing the Steelers' pick, he kept trying to help the team throughout the evening. He told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that when he met NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell he asked for a second wish, "So, do you think maybe you could unsuspend Ben Roethlisberger?" According to Zach, not even the Make-A-Wish Foundation can help the embattled quarterback; the commish just smiled and said, "I don't think we can do that."

5. Taking Kids Camping

If you offer to fulfill a kid's craziest wish, how many of them would choose to use it on other people? That's what 17-year-old Rankin, a Tennessee boy, did a few years ago. When the Make-A-Wish Foundation gave Rankin carte blanche to make one of his whims come true, he asked for a weekend camping trip for the children he tutored after school. Rankin had been tutoring younger kids from Chattanooga in his free time, and he wanted for them to get a chance to have a fun outdoor experience.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation was happy to make Rankin's unselfish dream a reality. They sent Rankin and his young pupils for an action-packed weekend of hiking, playing ball, and climbing walls at an Alabama summer camp.

6. Meeting Dwight Schrute

Even if you're a fan of The Office, the Scranton branch of Dunder Mifflin is probably the last place you'd want to visit. Sixteen-year-old Anna disagreed, though. The North Carolina teen wanted nothing more than to visit the set of the hit NBC sitcom, so she made a trip to California to meet the stars. Anna later told the Make-A-Wish Foundation's website that Steve Carrell broke out of his Michael Scott character and was "down to earth and normal" with her, while she really hit it off with B.J. Novak—he plays Ryan Howard on the show—and continued to exchange letters with him after returning home.
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To learn more about Make-A-Wish, visit wish.org.

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June 3, 2010 - 11:45am
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