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Why Does Sex Make Men Sleepy?

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Alfred Kinsey, biologist, pioneering sex researcher and founder of the Institute for Sex Research at Indiana University*, once wrote that "a marked quiescence of the total body is the most widely recognized outcome of orgasm," more noticeably among males. Why is that?

Let's get the obvious reasons out of the way first. Sex often, though not always, happens at night in a bed and is physically exhausting. If you're tired to begin with, all that physical exertion only adds to it, and since you're already in bed, it's only natural to be sleepy. Compounding this is the fact that sex dominates your attention when you're having it (and sometimes when you're not), so you don't pay attention to your breathing and wind up breathing shallowly and holding your breath pretty often. These aren't really the sorts of things you want to do during vigorous exercise, as they lead to oxygen deprivation and—all together now—sleepiness.

There's also the biochemistry of the orgasm to consider.

After sex, a man's brain releases a slew of hormones and neurotransmitters. Some of them, like prolactin, oxytocin and vasopressin, have been linked to sleep as well as sex. Prolactin plays a role in sexual satisfaction by counteracting the effects of dopamine** (which is responsible for sexual arousal). It's also been shown that the artificial delaying of an REM sleep period disrupts the rhythm of prolactin release, and that REM sleep is reduced in mice with prolactin deficiencies. Oxytocin and vasopressin have also both been implicated in the body's regulation of sleep cycles. While none of these chemicals are fully understood and their links to sleep aren't concrete, the circumstantial evidence suggests that they may play a part in pulling you off to a post-coital snooze.

What About the Ladies?

The phenomena of men falling asleep soon after sex is a little more well established than women doing the same—at least in that people notice it enough to make jokes about it on sitcoms, and write in to mental_floss asking about it. While I haven't been able to find any science-backed evidence that post-sex sleepiness definitively affects men more than women, there are a few hypotheses floating around as to why it seems that way. In their 2006 book Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex?, Mark Leyner and Billy Goldberg, M.D. suggest that exertion during sex depletes the muscles of energy-producing glycogen. Because men usually have more muscle mass, they get more tired. And it's entirely possible that women get just as sleepy, just as fast as men do after orgasm, but women simply have orgasms during sex less often than men do.

*Kinsey left his mark on a different field earlier in his career: entomology. He did his doctoral thesis on gall wasps and researched and published papers about them at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Of the 18 million+ insects in the museum's collections, about 5 million are gall wasps that Kinsey collected. In return for his collection, Kinsey received $400 and a lifetime membership to the Museum.

**The hormone may also mediate the "sexual refractory period," or the recovery phase after an orgasm during which a man cannot have additional orgasms or achieve an erection.

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Big Questions
What Is the Difference Between Generic and Name Brand Ibuprofen?
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What is the difference between generic ibuprofen vs. name brands?

Yali Friedman:

I just published a paper that answers this question: Are Generic Drugs Less Safe than their Branded Equivalents?

Here’s the tl;dr version:

Generic drugs are versions of drugs made by companies other than the company which originally developed the drug.

To gain FDA approval, a generic drug must:

  • Contain the same active ingredients as the innovator drug (inactive ingredients may vary)
  • Be identical in strength, dosage form, and route of administration
  • Have the same use indications
  • Be bioequivalent
  • Meet the same batch requirements for identity, strength, purity, and quality
  • Be manufactured under the same strict standards of FDA's good manufacturing practice regulations required for innovator products

I hope you found this answer useful. Feel free to reach out at www.thinkbiotech.com. For more on generic drugs, you can see our resources and whitepapers at Pharmaceutical strategic guidance and whitepapers

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

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Health
8 Potential Signs of a Panic Attack
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It's not just fear or worry. In fact, many panic attacks don’t look like panic at all. Panic attacks come on rapidly, and often at times that don't seem to make sense. The symptoms of panic disorder vary from person to person and even from attack to attack for the same person. The problems listed below are not unique to panic attacks, but if you're experiencing more than one, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor either way.

1. YOU'RE DIZZY.

Doctors sometimes call the autonomic nervous system (ANS) the "automatic nervous system" because it regulates many vital bodily functions like pumping blood all on its own, without our having to think about it. Panic attacks often manifest through the ANS, leading to increased heart rate or decreased blood pressure, which can in turn lead to feeling lightheaded or faint.

2. YOU'RE LOSING YOURSELF.

Feeling detached from yourself is called depersonalization. Feeling detached from the world, or like it's fake or somehow unreal, is called derealization. Both forms of dissociation are unsettling but common signs that a panic attack has begun.

3. YOU'RE QUEASY.

Our digestive system is often the first body part to realize that something is wrong. Panic sends stress hormones and tension to the gut and disrupts digestion, causing nausea, upset stomach, or heartburn.

4. YOU FEEL NUMB OR TINGLY.

Panic attacks can manifest in truly surprising ways, including pins and needles or numbness in a person's hands or face.

5. YOU'RE SWEATY OR SHIVERING.

The symptoms of a panic attack can look a lot like the flu. But if you don't have a fever and no one else has chattering teeth, it might be your ANS in distress.

6. YOU KNOW THE WORST IS COMING.

While it may sound prophetic or at least bizarre, a sense of impending doom is a very common symptom of panic attacks (and several other conditions). 

7. BREATHING IS DIFFICULT.

The ANS strikes again. In addition to the well-known problems of hyperventilation or shortness of breath, panic attacks can also cause dyspnea, in which a person feels like they can't fill their lungs, and feelings of choking or being smothered.

8. YOU'RE AFRAID OF HAVING A PANIC ATTACK. 

Oddly enough, anxiety about anxiety is itself a symptom of anxiety and panic attacks. Fear of losing control or getting upset can cause people to avoid situations that could be triggering, which can in turn limit their lives. 

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