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8 Marvelous Miniatures

If you've ever owned a dollhouse, you know how fascinating tiny little recreations can be. However, the world is more than a family home! There are artists and craftspeople all over who take a slice of a different kind of life and recreate it in miniature.

1. Folsom Prison Cell

Justin Jorgensen bought this miniature recreation of a prison cell built by George Bubier, the inmate who lives there. It was made with popsicle sticks, felt, glue, and various collected materials. Inmates sell artworks through the site Prisonart.org.

2. House of Prostitution

Toronto artist Leanne Eisen creates miniature scenes you don't see in toy stores. The project called Play recreates the interior of a brothel. Pictured is the bar area, complete with stripper pole. Along the same lines, Grace Shaw received a gift of a miniature row house and made it into a seedy city block, complete with a brothel, crack house, bar, and adult book store.

3. TV Studios

Charles Brogdon (Flickr user On The Set) has created some of the most popular classic sitcoms and game show sets in miniature scale model form. The fun is going through the pictures to see if you can identify the shows without looking at the name!

4. World War II

Mark Hogancamp is the master behind an elaborate fantasy we can follow in pictures and video. After he was badly injured, he created the world he calls Marwencol in his backyard as therapy, both physical and psychological. His pictures tell a story, which, along with Mark's story, has been made into a documentary film and a book.

5. View-Master Scenes

Anyone who grew up during the heyday of the View-Master probably wondered how they made those 3D scenes. Florence Thomas was one of the artists responsible for the stereoscopic images. She would sculpt Disney characters from clay and set them in dioramas, then take photographs from two angles to get the stereo effect.

6. San Francisco

The 2nd Annual Golden Gate Express Garden Railway was recently featured at San Francisco's Conservatory of Flowers. The garden featured miniature versions of the city's most recognizable landmarks, buildings, and of course, a train! Plus, they are all made of recycled materials. The exhibition has closed, but the photographs give us a virtual tour. Image by Todd Lappin.

7. Miniature Apple Store

Can you believe an exact replica of an Apple store, made in a shoebox? It's from the folks who brought you the miniature personal movie theater. They used iPhones for the display screen at the Genius Bar and for the glowing Apple logo.

8. Godzilla

Just for fun, here's a Japanese photographer's home. As he is setting up a shot, along comes Godzilla! See the story told in pictures in this post.

See also: miniatures from the world of fiction and fantasy in the post Dungeons and Dollhouses.

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Art
Art Lovers in England, Rejoice: France's Famous Bayeux Tapestry is Coming to the UK
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

One of France’s most prized national treasures, the Bayeux Tapestry, is officially heading to England for exhibition. The loan will mark the first time the fragile 11th century work has left France in nearly 1000 years, according to The Washington Post.

French president Emmanuel Macron announced news of the loan in mid-January, viewed by some as a gesture to smooth post-Brexit relations with Britain, ABC reports. The tapestry depicts the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, a historically important event replete with guts and glory.

Stretching for 210 feet, the Bayeux Tapestry’s nine embroidered panels tell the tale of Harold, Earl of Wessex, who swore an oath to support the right of William, Duke of Normandy, to the English throne once King Edward (a.k.a. Edward the Confessor) died without an heir. But after Edward's funeral at Westminster Abbey, Harold breaks his oath to William so he could be crowned king instead. Believing he was the rightful ruler, William—today remembered as William the Conqueror—decides to wage war and ultimately defeats Harold at the Battle of Hastings.

The historical narrative has endured for centuries, but the tapestry's provenance has been lost to time. Experts think that the artwork may have been created in England, shortly after the Battle of Hastings, although it’s unclear who designed and embroidered the scenes. Its original owner, Bishop Odo of Bayeux, the half-brother of William the Conqueror, may have commissioned the Bayeux Tapestry. He became Earl of Kent after the Battle of Hastings, and this new title would have afforded him access to skilled artisans, The Guardian explains.

The Bayeux Tapestry is currently on display in the town of Bayeux in Normandy. It likely won’t leave France until 2020, after conservators ensure that it’s safe to move the artwork. According to The Telegraph, the tapestry might be be displayed at the British Museum in 2022.

[h/t The Washington Post]

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Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.
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Design
This Snow Sculpture of a Car Was So Convincing Cops Tried to Write It a Ticket
Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.
Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.

Winter is a frustrating time to be on the road, but one artist in Montreal has found a way to make the best of it. As CBS affiliate WGCL-TV reports, his snow sculpture of a DeLorean DMC-12 was so convincing that even the police were fooled.

Simon Laprise of L.S.D Laprise Simon Designs assembled the prank car using snow outside his home in Montreal. He positioned it so it appeared to be parked along the side of the road, and with the weather Montreal has been having lately, a car buried under snow wasn’t an unusual sight.

A police officer spotted the car and was prepared to write it a ticket before noticing it wasn’t what it seemed. He called in backup to confirm that the car wasn’t a car at all.

Instead of getting mad, the officers shared a good laugh over it. “You made our night hahahahaha :)" they wrote on a fake ticket left on the snow sculpture.

The masterpiece was plowed over the next morning, but you can appreciate Laprise’s handiwork in the photos below.

Snow sculpture.

Snow sculpture of car.

Snow sculpture of car.

Note written in French.

[h/t WGCL-TV]

All images courtesy of Simon Laprise.

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