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The Weird Week in Review

Bass Tournament Cheating Leads to Jail Time

Cheating in a fishing tournament is taken very seriously in Texas, especially when there are expensive prizes involved. Robby Rose of Garland, Texas, was caught padding his catch in a bass tournament when a one-pound lead weight was found in the small fish he caught. Since the prize in the tournament was a $55,000 bass boat, he was charged with attempted felony theft. Rose pleaded guilty this week and was sentenced to fifteen days in jail and five years probation -plus he was forced to give up his fishing license.

Roof Collapse Leads to Surprise Rabbit Litters

The Nyköping exhibition is the biggest rabbit show of the year in Sweden. 1,648 rabbits and their owners participated in the February event. Heavy snowfall led to a collapsed roof during the show, and many rabbit cages were damaged, allowing the prize breeding rabbits to roam free.

"They made new friends and they became a bit aroused by the incident. The builders told me it was a veritable circus in there," one rabbit breeder told public broadcaster SVT's local Sörmland affiliate.

With rabbits of all stripes and colours trapped in the wreckage the pairing frenzy has thrown up all manner of new combinations, as Dwarf Hotots nuzzled up to British Giants and Lionheads mounted Himalayans.

A couple of months later, between 50 and 70 of the rabbit owners found themselves with surprise litters of bunnies that don't necessarily resemble the mother rabbit.

Dead Man Elected Mayor of Tennessee Town

Carl Robin Geary has been dead for several weeks. The people of Tracy City, Tennesee knew that. But Geary still won the mayor's race in a non-partisan election held Tuesday. Geary ended up with 268 votes, and the incumbent Barbara Brock took 85 votes. Brock had been appointed mayor of Tracy City when the previous mayor died 16 months ago.

Fox Kits Rescued with Detergent

Three fox kits got their heads stuck in a drain grate in Plainfield, Connecticut. Neighborhood residents could hear their mother calling for them from out of sight. After firefighters were unable to cut the grate, Animal Control Officer Karen Stone tried lubricating the kits' heads with Vaseline, then corn oil, but had no luck. What finally did the trick was a dose of Dawn dishwashing detergent. The kits were freed and driven back to the area of their den, soapy but unharmed. Before they were removed from the grate, the Plainfield police snapped a priceless picture of the three kits.

Accident-prone Man in Recovery Again

58-year-old Mick Wilary of Stanley, Co. Durham, England is in the hospital with crushed legs, recovering from being run over by a piece of heavy equipment. It's only the latest in a long line of mishaps that has earned him his reputation as Britain's most accident-prone man.

It follows breaks to both ankles, after he fell over a potato, and cracking his head open by tripping over a cat.

He has also fallen out of a raised bucket of a JCB, and was left with a broken collar bone when the horse he was riding got spooked by a plastic bag.

In total the grandfather-of-two has racked up more than 30 injuries, including 15 broken bones.

This is only a partial list of injuries, as Wilary started having accidents as a child. As he recuperated, he remarked that it's a good thing he doesn't drive.

Banana Museum Saved

Ken Bannister, the owner of the International Banana Club Museum, was forced to put the entire museum inventory up for sale when he lost his rented space. For a while it looked as if the museum would be no more, but the collection has now been sold to Fred Garbutt and his mother, Virginia who plan to reopen the museum. They paid an undisclosed amount for the museum, which they will house next door to Garbutt's liquor store North Shore, California. Garbutt explained how he plans to expand the museum and promote it with a BMW (Banana Museum Wagon). The Banana Museum will reopen in 2011.

Suspect Tries to Gnaw Off Fingerprints

Marijuana possession should not be a valid reason for self-mutilation, but 21-year-old Keith Simmonds Jr. was also on probation for conspiracy to murder and did not want to be identified. The Middleton, New Jersey man was arrested along with a passenger Monday night when police found pot in his vehicle. He managed to escape from the police car and fled. When he was found on Monday, police say his fingers were bloodied by an attempt to remove his own fingerprints. Simmonds is being held on a variety of charges, including the theft of the handcuffs he was wearing as he escaped and tampering with evidence for trying to remove his fingerprints.

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Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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Food
Cheese Wheel Wedding Cakes Are a Funky Twist on an Old Tradition
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

If there’s ever a time you have permission to be cheesy, it’s on your wedding day. What better way to do so than with a pungent wedding cake made of actual wheels of cheese? According to Elite Daily, cheese wedding cakes are a real option for couples who share an affinity for dairy products.

One of the trailblazers behind the sharp trend is Bath, England-based cheese supplier The Fine Cheese Co. The company offers clients a choice of one of dozens of wedding cake designs. There are bold show-stoppers like the Beatrice cake, which features five tiers of cheese and is priced at $400. For customers looking for something more delicate, there’s the Clara centerpiece, which replaces miniature wedding cakes with mounds of goat cheese. Whether your loved one likes funky Stilton or mellow brie, there’s a cheese cake to satisfy every palate. Flowers are incorporated into each display to make them just as pretty as conventional wedding cakes.

Since The Fine Cheese Co. arranged their first wedding cake in 2002, other cheese suppliers have entered the game. The Cheese Shed in Newton Abbot, England; I.J. Ellis Cheesemongers in Scotland; and Murray’s Cheese in New York will provide cheese wheel towers for weddings or any other special occasion. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from clearing out the local fromagerie and assembling a cheese cake at home.

[h/t Elite Daily]

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Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
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History
The Funky History of George Washington's Fake Teeth
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo

George Washington may have the most famous teeth—or lack thereof—in American history. But counter to what you may have heard about the Founding Father's ill-fitting dentures, they weren't made of wood. In fact, he had several sets of dentures throughout his life, none of which were originally trees. And some of them are still around. The historic Mount Vernon estate holds the only complete set of dentures that has survived the centuries, and the museum features a video that walks through old George's dental history.

Likely due to genetics, poor diet, and dental disease, Washington began losing his original teeth when he was still a young man. By the time he became president in 1789, he only had one left in his mouth. The dentures he purchased to replace his teeth were the most scientifically advanced of the time, but in the late 18th century, that didn't mean much.

They didn't fit well, which caused him pain, and made it difficult to eat and talk. The dentures also changed the way Washington looked. They disfigured his face, causing his lips to noticeably stick out. But that doesn't mean Washington wasn't grateful for them. When he finally lost his last surviving tooth, he sent it to his dentist, John Greenwood, who had made him dentures of hippo ivory, gold, and brass that accommodated the remaining tooth while it still lived. (The lower denture of that particular pair is now held at the New York Academy of Medicine.)

A set of historic dentures
George Washington's Mount Vernon

These days, no one would want to wear dentures like the ones currently held at Mount Vernon (above). They're made of materials that would definitely leave a bad taste in your mouth. The base that fit the fake teeth into the jaw was made of lead. The top teeth were sourced from horses or donkeys, and the bottom were from cows and—wait for it—people.

These teeth actually deteriorated themselves, revealing the wire that held them together. The dentures open and shut thanks to metal springs, but because they were controlled by springs, if he wanted to keep his mouth shut, Washington had to permanently clench his jaw. You can get a better idea of how the contraption worked in the video from Mount Vernon below.

Washington's Dentures from Mount Vernon on Vimeo.

There are plenty of lessons we can learn from the life of George Washington, but perhaps the most salient is this: You should definitely, definitely floss.

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