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The Secret Society for Creative Philanthropy

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If you were walking through the pouring rain and someone offered you an umbrella, would you accept it or assume it was some sort of weird scam? If you said you would take it and you live in a big city, then you're probably in the minority. That's what David Ibnale discovered when he tried to provide San Franciscans with free umbrellas in the middle of a downpour:

"People thought there was something fishy about it," Ibnale said. "There wasn't. It was just free umbrellas."

David received funds for his umbrella giveaway from the Secret Society for Creative Philanthropy, a new Bay Area charity dedicated to getting people to do nice things for other people. The charity gives out $100 awards every year to people who propose to help strangers in a unique manner.

Other recipients of the cash awards this year tried to give money to others as long as they promised to give it to someone else, bought drinks for an entire bar, and sent candy to students studying in South America. The mother of the charity's founder broke her $100 into quarters and scattered the change around the playground of an elementary school.

What would you do if you could have $100 to brighten the world?

[Image courtesy of Flickr user anna_t.]

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Johan Ordonez, Getty Images
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science
This Organization Wants Your Old Eclipse Glasses
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Johan Ordonez, Getty Images

On Monday, August 21, America hosted what may have been the most-viewed solar eclipse in history. While those of us in the United States are still processing the awesome sight, residents of South America and Asia are just starting to look forward to the next total eclipse in 2019—and anyone who still has their protective glasses on hand can help them prepare.

According to Gizmodo, Astronomers Without Borders is accepting donations of used eyewear following Monday’s event. Any glasses they collect will be redistributed to schools across Asia and South America where children can use them to view the world’s next total eclipse in safety.

Astronomers Without Borders is dedicated to making astronomy accessible to people around the world. For this most recent eclipse, they provided 100,000 free glasses to schools, youth community centers, and children's hospitals in the U.S. If you’re willing to contribute to their next effort, hold on to your specs for now—the group plans to the announce the address where you can send them in the near future. Donors who don't have the patience to wait for updates on the group's Facebook page can send glasses immediately to its corporate sponsor, Explore Scientific, at 1010 S. 48th Street, Springdale, Arizona 72762.

Not sure if your glasses are suitable for reuse? Here’s the criteria they should meet for sun-gazing.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Tab for a Cause
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You Could Be Donating to Charity Every Time You Open a New Tab
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Tab for a Cause

Opening up a million browser tabs on your desktop is hard on your computer, but could be good for non-profits. A web app by Gladly, an ad network focused on giving users more power over the ads they see, collects money for charities every time you open a new tab.

Tab for a Cause (which we spotted through Fast Company) is a browser extension that trades a few milliseconds of your attention for money that then goes to nonprofits around the world. When you use the site to navigate to websites, Tab for a Cause earns money from their advertisers (there are two ads on the bottom right-hand corner of the website). The company then funnels a portion of that money to a pre-selected group of nonprofits. With the help of those few extra ads, each tab you open raises between 1/10 and 1/3 of a cent for charity.

The app turns opening new tabs and raising money for good causes into a bit of a game. When you invite friends or run Google searches through Tab for a Cause, you earn "hearts" that help you get to different levels of being "a tabber." Then, you can donate these hearts to the charity of your choice, including Save the Children, Human Rights Watch, and Water.org. You can team up with your friends to compare earnings and see who's doing the most good with their online activity.

Tab for a Cause landing page with widgets for social media sites
Tab for a Cause

However, you do have to navigate to new tabs using the Tab for a Cause screen. Clicking on a link in this article, for instance, won’t count—because you aren’t seeing that Tab for a Cause advertising. Those one or two extra clicks could be worth some real money for a nonprofit, though, so it’s a good deed.

Tab for a Cause works on Chrome and Firefox.

[h/t Fast Company]

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