5 Things You Didn't Know About Quincy Jones

iStock/GreenPimp
iStock/GreenPimp

Quincy Jones has certainly had an interesting career. He's done everything from conducting Frank Sinatra's band to producing films to fathering TV and movie star Rashida Jones. Along the way he's picked up a record 76 Grammy nominations "“ 26 of which he won "“ and sold millions of records. Here are a few things you might not know about the multitalented star.

1. He Attended His Own Memorial Service

In 1974 Jones had a pair of brain aneurysms, and the prognosis was pretty grim. Since it looked like he might not have much time left, his family and friends started planning a memorial service. Although Jones was in poor health, he talked his neurologist into letting him attend the service, which was held at the Shrine in Los Angeles. The doctor was worried that Jones' health would suffer if he got too worked up during the service, so he sat next to Jones throughout the ceremony. Jones later told Newsweek that staying calm "was hard to do with Richard Pryor, Marvin Gaye, Sarah Vaughn and Sidney Poitier singing your praises."

2. He Didn't Love Michael Jackson's Menagerie

Jones' collaborations with Michael Jackson may have yielded such beloved records as Off the Wall and Thriller, but at least one thing about the King of Pop irritated Jones: Jackson's collection of animals.

Last year Jones told Details that Jackson would often bring his boa constrictor, Muscles, into the studio and let the snake wrap itself around the producer's leg and slither across his console. As Jones succinctly put it, "I was never comfortable with that." Here's a great video of Jones looking a bit uneasy around Muscles:

Jones' relationship with Jackson's famous chimp, Bubbles, was even worse. In the same interview with Details, Jones revealed that Bubbles once bit his daughter Rashida in the hand.

3. He Had Some Interesting TV Credits

You may know that Jones composed quite possibly the greatest TV theme song of all time for Sanford and Son, but he had some other fun TV credits, too. Jones' other theme song credits include In the Heat of the Night and Ironside. He also wrote the music for the theme song for The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, a show for which he also served as executive producer. 

4. Picasso Taught Him How to Pay a Bill

In his autobiography Q, Jones writes about Pablo Picasso, who was his neighbor while Jones was living in Cannes. Jones tells a story of being in a restaurant one day when Picasso, his wife, and a friend walked in. Picasso's party joined Jones, and they enjoyed the restaurant's sole meuniere. According to Jones, when Picasso was done with his fish, he pushed the plate of bones into a window to dry for a bit, then carefully arranged them on his plate and drew on them with markers. The end result was a neat little Picasso design.

When the check for the meal came, Picasso gave the waiter the plate of decorated fish bones instead of any cash. According to Jones, the bones were on the restaurant's wall by the next day, which prompted him to say that Picasso was "who I want to be when I grow up."

5. He Helped Oprah Hit it Big (Because He Liked Her Name)

After working on the film The Wiz, Jones decided to try his hand at producing movies. He obtained the rights to Alice Walker's The Color Purple and miraculously convinced Steve Spielberg to direct the adaptation while working for scale. He ran into a bit of trouble casting the picture, though, when he couldn't find the perfect actress to play the part of Sophia.

Then, on a trip to Chicago he saw a young reporter named Oprah Winfrey who seemed like a great fit for the part. As Jones later wrote, "I had never heard a name like that. Oprah spelled backward is Harpo, and we needed to cast Sophia, who was married to Harpo in The Color Purple. It had to happen." That logic may seem a bit circuitous, but the casting worked out so well that Oprah earned an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress, one of 11 nominations the film received (though the film did not win any).

'5 Things You Didn't Know About...' appears every Friday. If there's someone you'd like to see covered, leave us a comment. You can read the previous installments here.

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The 8 Best Horror Movies to Stream on Hulu Right Now

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

Looking for a good scare this Halloween season? If you’re a Hulu subscriber, you’ll be able to get your fill of creepy content. Check out eight of the best horror movies currently streaming on the service.

1. Hellraiser (1987)

Horror author Clive Barker made the move to feature directing with this tale of a man (Sean Chapman) who makes the grievous error of opening a portal to hell and proceeds to make his brother’s family targets of the sadistic Cenobites, led by Pinhead (Doug Bradley). Don’t bother with the endless sequels; the original is the best (and goriest) of the lot.

2. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Paranoia runs deep in this remake of the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). In the ‘70s iteration, Donald Sutherland plays a health inspector who can’t shake the feeling that people around him seem a little off. He soon grows wise to the reality that aliens are walking among us as virtual human replicas. Naturally, they’re not keen on being discovered.

3. A Quiet Place (2018)

John Krasinski and Emily Blunt star as a couple living in a world terrorized by creatures that hunt by sound. Their largely-silent existence means every stray creak, cry, or noise threatens to expose them to the monsters—a danger that's only compounded when Blunt discovers she’s pregnant.

4. The Orphanage (2007)

A sense of dread looms over The Orphanage, a Spanish-language thriller with Belén Rueda as Laura, who returns to the child care facility that raised her so she can make a difference for a new generation of children. Strange things begin as soon as she arrives, with her son going missing and hints of unwelcome guests unraveling her nerves. It’s a film best not watched alone.

5. Event Horizon (1997)

If 1979’s Alien stirred your interest in space scares, Event Horizon might make for a worthwhile watch. After a spaceship presumed lost suddenly reappears, a crew of investigators (Sam Neill, Laurence Fishburne) board to find answers.

6. Children of the Corn (1984)

A couple (Peter Horton, Linda Hamilton) passing through a small rural town find a lack of adult supervision curious—until the kids reveal themselves to be homicidal cult members. Based on a Stephen King short story.

7. Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987)

Bruce Campbell and Sam Raimi perfected “splatstick” horror in this cult classic about hapless boob Ash (Campbell) who escapes to a remote cabin retreat with girlfriend Linda (Denise Bixler) and unwittingly unleashes a cascade of evil. Though it’s more amusing than scary, Raimi’s inventive imagery is morbidly fascinating.

8. Child’s Play (1988)

Good mom Catherine Hicks buys a Good Guys doll for her son, Andy. Unfortunately, the doll—dubbed Chucky—has been possessed by the spirit of a serial killer (Brad Dourif) and proceeds to make young Andy’s life miserable, particularly after he discovers the kitchen cutlery.

25 of Oscar Wilde's Wittiest Quotes

By Napoleon Sarony - Library of Congress, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
By Napoleon Sarony - Library of Congress, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

On October 16, 1854, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin, Ireland. He would go on to become one of the world's most prolific writers, dabbling in everything from plays and poetry to essays and fiction. Whatever the medium, his wit shone through.

1. On God

"I think that God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability."

2. On the world as a stage

"The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast."

3. On forgiveness

"Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much."

4. On good vs. bad

"It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious."

5. On getting advice

"The only thing to do with good advice is pass it on. It is never any use to oneself."

6. On happiness

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go."

7. On cynicism

"What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing."

8. On sincerity

"A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal."

9. On money

"When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old I know that it is."

10. On life's greatest tragedies

"There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it."

11. On hard work

"Work is the curse of the drinking classes."

12. On living within one's means

"Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination."

13. On true friends

"True friends stab you in the front."

14. On mothers

"All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That's his."

15. On fashion

"Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months."

16. On being talked about

"There is only one thing in life worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about."

17. On genius

"Genius is born—not paid."

18. On morality

"Morality is simply the attitude we adopt towards people whom we personally dislike."

19. On relationships

"How can a woman be expected to be happy with a man who insists on treating her as if she were a perfectly normal human being?"

20. On the definition of a "gentleman"

"A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone’s feelings unintentionally."

21. On boredom

"My own business always bores me to death; I prefer other people’s."

22. On aging

"The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything, the young know everything."

23. On men and women

"I like men who have a future and women who have a past."

24. On poetry

"There are two ways of disliking poetry; one way is to dislike it, the other is to read Pope."

25. On wit

"Quotation is a serviceable substitute for wit."

And one bonus quote about Oscar Wilde! Dorothy Parker said it best in a 1927 issue of Life:

If, with the literate, I am
Impelled to try an epigram,
I never seek to take the credit;
We all assume that Oscar said it.

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